Syphilis: A Reemerging Infection



FREE PREVIEW Log in or buy this issue to read the full article. AAFP members and paid subscribers get free access to all articles. Subscribe now.


FREE PREVIEW Subscribe or buy this issue. AAFP members and paid subscribers get free access to all articles.

Am Fam Physician. 2012 Sep 1;86(5):433-440.

  Patient information: See related handout on syphilis, written by the authors of this article.

  Related letter: Serologic Cross-Reactivity of Syphilis, Yaws, and Pinta

Rates of primary and secondary syphilis have increased in the past decade, warranting renewed attention to the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Men who have sex with men are particularly affected; however, increases in infection rates have also been noted in women, as well as in all age groups and ethnicities. Physicians need to vigilantly screen high-risk patients. The concurrent rise in congenital syphilis also requires special attention and reemphasizes the need for continued early prenatal care and syphilis screening for all pregnant women. Syphilis infection in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus has also become more common. New experimental diagnostic approaches, including using the B cell chemoattractant chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 13 as a cerebrospinal fluid marker, may help identify suspected neurosyphilis cases. Additionally, point-of-care immunochromatographic strip testing has been suggested for screening high-risk populations in developing countries. Nontreponemal screening tests followed by treponemal confirmatory tests continue to be standard diagnostics; however, interpreting false-negative and false-positive test results, and identifying serofast reactions, can be challenging. Although doxycycline, tetracycline, ceftriaxone, and azithromycin have been used to successfully treat syphilis, penicillin remains the drug of choice in all stages of infection and is the therapy recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Close follow-up is necessary to ensure treatment success.

Syphilis has predictable stages and well-established diagnostic and treatment strategies; however, these warrant revisiting because the incidence of syphilis has been increasing in the past decade. Syphilis is caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum, and is spread primarily through sexual contact. A high index of suspicion is necessary because of the many clinical manifestations of the disease. From the laboratory standpoint, syphilis can be difficult to diagnose because of a several-week delay between infection and the development of an immunologic response. In addition, a substantial percentage of patients who were treated previously present with serofast reactions, which require careful interpretation to avoid overtreatment. Careful attention to the history and physical examination, testing of high-risk populations, and appropriate monitoring can help keep this disease under control.

SORT: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Clinical recommendation Evidence rating References

Patients with a negative Venereal Disease Research Laboratory or rapid plasma reagin test and strong clinical indicators of primary syphilis should have repeat nontreponemal serology in two weeks.

C

5

All patients with confirmed syphilis should be tested for human immunodeficiency virus.

C

5

All sexually active men who have sex with men should have syphilis serology at least annually.

C

5

Penicillin G benzathine is the first-line treatment for all stages of syphilis, except neurosyphilis.

C

5

Intravenous aqueous crystalline penicillin G is the first-line treatment for neurosyphilis.

C

5


A = consistent, good-quality patient-oriented evidence; B = inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence; C = consensus, disease-oriented evidence, usual practice, expert opinion, or case series. For information about the SORT evidence rating system, go to http://www.aafp.org/afpsort.xml.

SORT: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE

View Table

SORT: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE

Clinical recommendation Evidence rating References

Patients with a negative Venereal Disease Research Laboratory or rapid plasma reagin test and strong clinical indicators of primary syphilis should have repeat nontreponemal serology in two weeks.

C

5

All patients with confirmed syphilis should be tested for human immunodeficiency virus.

C

5

All sexually active men who have sex with men should have syphilis serology at least annually.

C

5

Penicillin G benzathine is the first-line treatment for all stages of syphilis, except neurosyphilis.

C

5

Intravenous aqueous crystalline penicillin G is the first-line treatment for neurosyphilis.

C

5


A = consistent, good-quality patient-oriented evidence; B = inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence; C = consensus, disease-oriented evidence, usual practice, expert opinion, or case series. For information about the SORT evidence rating system, go to http://www.aafp.org/afpsort.xml.

Epidemiology

In 2000, primary and secondary syphilis rates in the United States were at an all-time low (2.1 cases per 100,000 persons)1; however, outbreaks of the infection were reported in men who have sex with men.2 Rates of infection with primary and secondary syphilis increased 15.2 percent between 2006 and 2007, from 3.3 to 3.8 cases per 100,000 persons.3 Most primary and secondary syphilis cases (84 percent) reported in 2004 to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were in men.1 Men who have sex with men are particularly affected3; however, increases in infection rates over the past decade have also been noted in women, as well as in all age groups and ethnicities including Asian, black, Hispanic, and white persons. Additionally, the CDC recently reported a 23 percent increase in congenital syphilis in the United States, from 8.2 cases per 100,000 live births in 2005 to 10.1 cases per 100,000 live births in 2008.4

Stages

Table 1 lists stages, time course, and manifestations of syphilis.5

Table 1.

Stages, Time Course, and Manifestations of Syphilis

Stage Time Manifestations
Common Uncommon

Primary

10 to 90 days

Chancre

Local lymphadenopathy

Secondary

1 to 3 months

Arthralgia, condylomata lata, fatigue, generalized lymphadenopathy, headache, maculopapular/papulosquamous exanthema, myalgia, pharyngitis

Annular syphilis, iritis, pustular syphilis, pyrexia, syphilitic alopecia, ulceronodular syphilis

Early latent

After primary or secondary stages, 1 year or less of no symptoms

None

None

Late latent

More than 1 year of no symptoms

None

None

Tertiary

Months to years

Late neurosyphilis*

Cardiovascular syphilis, gummatous syphilis


*—Neurosyphilis may occur at any stage of infection.

Information from reference 5.

Table 1.   Stages, Time Course, and Manifestations of Syphilis

View Table

Table 1.

Stages, Time Course, and Manifestations of Syphilis

Stage Time Manifestations
Common Uncommon

Primary

10 to 90 days

Chancre

Local lymphadenopathy

Secondary

1 to 3 months

Arthralgia, condylomata lata, fatigue, generalized lymphadenopathy, headache, maculopapular/papulosquamous exanthema, myalgia, pharyngitis

Annular syphilis, iritis, pustular syphilis, pyrexia, syphilitic alopecia, ulceronodular syphilis

Early latent

After primary or secondary stages, 1 year or less of no symptoms

None

None

Late latent

More than 1 year of no symptoms

None

None

Tertiary

Months to years

Late neurosyphilis*

Cardiovascular syphilis, gummatous syphilis


*—Neurosyphilis may occur at any stage of infection.

Information from reference 5.

PRIMARY

The classic description of primary syphilis is a solitary nontender genital chancre. This represents the first site of T. pallidum invasion and the resultant dermatologic response to infection. Patients may present to their physician with this finding if noticed; however, the infection site may easily go undetected if it is in a difficult area to visualize, such as the cervix or anus/rectum. Also, chancres are occasionally (2 to 7 percent) found extragenitally, at sites including the fingers, nipples, and oral mucosa.6,7 Patients may have multiple chancres (Figure 1); the presence of such should not dissuade the consideration of syphilis in the differential diagnosis.8

Figure 1.

Two 4-mm chancres on the penis caused by primary syphilis.

View Large


Figure 1.

Two 4-mm chancres on the penis caused by primary syphilis.


Figure 1.

Two 4-mm chancres on the penis caused by primary syphilis.

SECONDARY

Untreated primary syphilis progresses to secondary syphilis six to eight weeks after the primary infection. The characteristic exanthem of secondary syphilis involves the trunk, face, and extremities. Morphology tends to be generalized pink to red macules and papules (Figure 2). Several other mucocutaneous manifestations are possible (Figure 3). Syphilitic alopecia is well described in the literature and is characterized as having a “moth-eaten” appearance. Although the moth-eaten appearance occurs only in 4 to 12.5 percent of of patients with secondary syphilis, recognition is crucial because it may be the sole presenting symptom.9

Figure 2.

Red-tan scaling macules and patches on the abdomen caused by secondary syphilis.

View Large


Figure 2.

Red-tan scaling macules and patches on the abdomen caused by secondary syphilis.


Figure 2.

Red-tan scaling macules and patches on the abdomen caused by secondary syphilis.

Figure 3.

4- to 6-mm red ulcerations (arrows) on the tongue caused by oral secondary syphilis.

View Large


Figure 3.

4- to 6-mm red ulcerations (arrows) on the tongue caused by oral secondary syphilis.


Figure 3.

4- to 6-mm red ulcerations (arrows) on the tongue caused by oral secondary syphilis.

Cutaneous manifestations are caused by direct infiltration of pathogens; therefore, direct visualization of treponemes with dark-field microscopy is possible when sampling lesions. Condylomata lata are an example of these lesions. They are intertriginous mucosal papules that tend to become macerated and form flat, moist, infectious lesions.10 Lues maligna, also known as ulceronodular or malignant syphilis, is a severe form of secondary syphilis. It has been observed in immunosuppressed patients,1115 as well as in otherwise healthy persons.14,16

LATENT

If untreated in the primary or secondary stage, syphilis can progress to the latent stage, which can be characterized by an absence of symptoms. The latent stage is further divided into early and late latency. The distinction between the two stages is important because it relates to infectivity of the patient. Regarding sexual transmission, patients with syphilis in the early latency stage remain infectious, whereas those with syphilis in the late latency stage are thought to be noninfectious. The CDC regards early latency as a one-year interval without symptoms of primary or secondary syphilis (this is the commonly accepted definition in the United States).17 Late latency is the period beyond one year in which the patient is symptom-free. Patients with unknown infection duration will typically be treated as if they have latent syphilis. Syphilis may remain in latency without treatment in two-thirds of patients, and will progress to the tertiary stage in one-third of patients.18

TERTIARY

Tertiary syphilis is characterized by a persistent low-level burden of pathogens, against which a potent and self-destructive immune response is mounted.19 Three presentations of tertiary syphilis are neurosyphilis, cardiovascular syphilis, and late benign syphilis. Neurosyphilis occurs as a consequence of treponemal penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Cardiovascular syphilis largely affects the great vessels, most commonly manifesting as ascending aortitis.19 Late benign syphilis represents one-half of tertiary syphilis cases and appears as granulomas, gummas, and psoriasiform plaques.20

Neurosyphilis

Neurosyphilis can occur at any stage of infection and has manifold presentations.19 Meningovascular syphilis may result in cerebrovascular accident and can cause widespread or focal changes, depending on the arteries involved. General paresis is characterized by emotional lability, memory deficit, and psychosis. Changes in the posterior columns lead to tabes dorsalis, characterized by sensory ataxia of the lower extremities.19 It is difficult to predict which patients will be affected by these syndromes.

Congenital

Rates of congenital syphilis are increasing, reemphasizing the need for continued early prenatal care and syphilis screening for all pregnant women. Congenital syphilis may result from transplacental transmission or contact with infectious lesions during birth. Two-thirds of neonates with congenital syphilis are asymptomatic at birth.21 In symptomatic infants, signs typically manifest early (birth through 48 months) or late (49 months through the first two decades of life).21  Table 2 lists presentations of congenital syphilis.21 The most common early signs include hepatosplenomegaly, rash, fever, and signs of neurosyphilis, especially bulging fontanelle, seizures, and cranial nerve palsies.21 Late signs may occur in untreated infants and include frontal bossing, nasal cartilage destruction, and dental abnormalities. The high case fatality ratio and significant morbidity associated with congenital syphilis dictates the need for targeted outreach to at-risk mothers, particularly crack cocaine users living in urban areas who have sex with multiple partners in exchange for drugs.

Table 2.

Presentations of Congenital Syphilis

Presentation Descriptive findings Time Frequency

Rash

Morbilliform eruption resembling acquired secondary syphilis

Early

Common

Parrot pseudoparalysis

Painful epiphysitis causing reluctance to move

Early

Uncommon

Snuffles

Rhinitis with blood-stained mucus

Early

Uncommon

Syphilitic pemphigus

Bullae favoring distal extremities

Early

Uncommon

Higouménakis sign

Unilateral enlargement of the sternoclavicular portion of the clavicle

Late

Common

Hutchinson teeth

Peg-shaped permanent upper central incisors

Late

Common

Mulberry molars

Extra cusps on first molars

Late

Common

Olympian brow

Frontal bossing of forehead

Late

Common

Saddle nose

Degradation of nasal cartilage

Late

Common

Clutton joints

Sterile symmetric effusions of major joints

Late

Uncommon

Saber shins

Bowing of tibia

Late

Uncommon


Information from reference 21.

Table 2.   Presentations of Congenital Syphilis

View Table

Table 2.

Presentations of Congenital Syphilis

Presentation Descriptive findings Time Frequency

Rash

Morbilliform eruption resembling acquired secondary syphilis

Early

Common

Parrot pseudoparalysis

Painful epiphysitis causing reluctance to move

Early

Uncommon

Snuffles

Rhinitis with blood-stained mucus

Early

Uncommon

Syphilitic pemphigus

Bullae favoring distal extremities

Early

Uncommon

Higouménakis sign

Unilateral enlargement of the sternoclavicular portion of the clavicle

Late

Common

Hutchinson teeth

Peg-shaped permanent upper central incisors

Late

Common

Mulberry molars

Extra cusps on first molars

Late

Common

Olympian brow

Frontal bossing of forehead

Late

Common

Saddle nose

Degradation of nasal cartilage

Late

Common

Clutton joints

Sterile symmetric effusions of major joints

Late

Uncommon

Saber shins

Bowing of tibia

Late

Uncommon


Information from reference 21.

HIV Coinfection

Syphilis coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has become more common and presents unique challenges. Persons who are HIV positive are at increased risk of developing neurosyphilis,22,23 and tend to have higher cerebrospinal fluid HIV viral loads.24 It is unclear how long it takes to develop clinical neurosyphilis after central nervous system infection. The CDC makes the same recommendations for cerebrospinal fluid examination in persons who are HIV negative and HIV positive: it should be performed in all patients with syphilis and neurologic symptoms, and in all patients with serologic or clinical evidence of treatment failure.5 A recent study found greater success in detecting asymptomatic neurosyphilis in persons who are HIV positive by applying serologic criteria (CD4 cell count less than 350 cells per mm3 and/or rapid plasma reagin [RPR] titer greater than 1:32) instead of stage-based criteria.25 Another new development in the detection of neurosyphilis in patients who are HIV positive is the experimental use of the B cell chemoattractant chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 13 as a cerebrospinal fluid marker.26

Diagnosis

Patients suspected of having syphilis are usually screened with nontreponemal tests, including the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) and RPR tests (Table 3).19 These tests become positive within three weeks of development of the primary chancre, so patients may have negative nontreponemal tests very early in infection.27 In general, only 30 to 40 percent of patients are diagnosed at the primary stage.10 This may be because of small, difficult to visualize, or otherwise unnoticed primary infection sites. Although the chancre may develop within one week of exposure, immunoglobulin M antibodies take two to three weeks to be detectable.28 During this gap, dark-field microscopy is an invaluable tool for directly visualizing pathogens from chancre fluid; however, this method requires special equipment and experienced technicians.

Table 3.

Common Diagnostic Tests for Syphilis

Test Explanation Advantages Limitations

Dark-field microscopy

Direct visualization of spirochetes in ulcer exudate fluid

Immediate diagnosis

Allows for faster partner notification

Not useful for oral lesions (nonvenereal treponemes inhabit the mouth)

Dark-field microscope required

Requires experienced technician

Nontreponemal serology (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test, rapid plasma reagin test)

Detects antibodies to cardiolipin in blood

Inexpensive

Titers correlate with treatment success/failure

Lack reactivity in early primary syphilis

High titer levels may be read as false negative (prozone phenomenon)

1 to 2 percent false-positive rate in pregnant women and in persons with autoimmune disorders, lymphoma, malaria, cirrhosis

Treponemal serology (fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test)

Detects antibodies to T. pallidum in blood

Confirmatory test with high specificity and low false-positive rate

Becomes reactive earlier in primary syphilis than nontreponemal tests

Relatively expensive

Lack reactivity in early primary syphilis


Information from reference 19.

Table 3.   Common Diagnostic Tests for Syphilis

View Table

Table 3.

Common Diagnostic Tests for Syphilis

Test Explanation Advantages Limitations

Dark-field microscopy

Direct visualization of spirochetes in ulcer exudate fluid

Immediate diagnosis

Allows for faster partner notification

Not useful for oral lesions (nonvenereal treponemes inhabit the mouth)

Dark-field microscope required

Requires experienced technician

Nontreponemal serology (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test, rapid plasma reagin test)

Detects antibodies to cardiolipin in blood

Inexpensive

Titers correlate with treatment success/failure

Lack reactivity in early primary syphilis

High titer levels may be read as false negative (prozone phenomenon)

1 to 2 percent false-positive rate in pregnant women and in persons with autoimmune disorders, lymphoma, malaria, cirrhosis

Treponemal serology (fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay, Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test)

Detects antibodies to T. pallidum in blood

Confirmatory test with high specificity and low false-positive rate

Becomes reactive earlier in primary syphilis than nontreponemal tests

Relatively expensive

Lack reactivity in early primary syphilis


Information from reference 19.

Patients with a positive RPR or VDRL test should undergo specific treponemal testing, such as the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay or the T. pallidum particle agglutination test to confirm infection with T. pallidum. Patients with a negative VDRL or RPR test and strong clinical indicators of primary syphilis should have repeat nontreponemal serology in two weeks.5 Persons with confirmed syphilis should be tested for HIV.5 Syphilis is a reportable disease in every state and must be reported in accordance with state and local health departments.

Successful treatment of primary and secondary syphilis should be followed by a fourfold decline in RPR/VDRL titer over the next three to six months.29 Nontreponemal test titers may decline slower than fourfold over three to six months in patients who were reinfected with syphilis. Nontreponemal tests may revert to negative following treatment (seroreversion); this is more likely to occur with low initial titers and with treatment in the primary or secondary stage.29 Some patients' nontreponemal titers do not serorevert following successful treatment; this is called a serofast reaction.5 All patients should have repeat clinical and serologic evaluation (with the same nontreponemal test used at diagnosis) six and 12 months after treatment.5 Patients with continued clinical signs and symptoms, or a fourfold increase in titer (compared with the nontreponemal titer at diagnosis), should be treated again and retested for HIV.5 Even following successful treatment, specific treponemal tests may remain positive for years and should not be used to assess treatment response.5 All sexually active men who have sex with men should have syphilis serology at least annually.5

Cerebrospinal fluid examination should be performed in patients with syphilis and neurologic symptoms, and in patients with clinical or serologic evidence of treatment failure.5 Recent advances in strain-typing have identified T. pallidum isolates that have an increased association with neurosyphilis.30 Studying these particular isolates may help to better understand the pathogenesis of neurosyphilis and lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

Recently, point-of-care immunochromatographic strip testing has been suggested for screening high-risk populations in developing countries with low diagnostic capacity.31 Immunochromatographic strip tests use a strip containing treponemal antigens that react with antibodies to syphilis in the whole blood or serum of infected persons to produce a visualized change on the test strip. Although not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States, these inexpensive, rapid tests have been reported in a recent review to have a sensitivity of 78 to 100 percent and specificity of 97 to 99 percent.31

Management

The treatment plan for syphilis, as detailed by the CDC, remains relatively unchanged in recent years and continues to vary with stage of infection (Table 4).5 Primary, secondary, and early latent syphilis can be treated with a single intramuscular dose of 2.4 million units of penicillin G benzathine.5 A longer treatment course of 2.4 million units of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine every week for three weeks is recommended for late latent syphilis, for tertiary syphilis, or if infection duration is unknown. Neurosyphilis requires 3 to 4 million units of intravenous aqueous crystalline penicillin G every four hours for 10 to 14 days.5

Table 4.

Treatment of Syphilis

Stage Treatment

Primary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

In persons allergic to penicillin:

Doxycycline,* 100 mg orally twice daily for 14 days

Tetracycline,† 500 mg orally four times daily for 14 days

Ceftriaxone (Rocephin),‡ 1 g intravenously or intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

Azithromycin (Zithromax),‡ 2 g orally once

Secondary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

In persons allergic to penicillin:

Doxycycline,* 100 mg orally twice daily for 14 days

Tetracycline,† 500 mg orally four times daily for 14 days

Ceftriaxone,‡ 1 g intravenously or intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

Azithromycin,‡ 2 g orally once

Early latent

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

Late latent

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly weekly for three weeks

Tertiary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly weekly for three weeks

Neurosyphilis

Aqueous crystalline penicillin G, 18 to 24 million units daily administered as 3 to 4 million units intravenously every 4 hours for 10 to 14 days

or

Penicillin G procaine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

plus

Probenecid, 500 mg orally four times daily for 10 to 14 days

Congenital

Complex treatment

Reference the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention treatment plan at http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/STD-Treatment-2010-RR5912.pdf


*—Preferred alternative treatment in patients with primary or secondary syphilis who are allergic to penicillin.

†—Higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects and less convenient dosing schedule compared with doxycycline.

‡—Optimal dose and duration of therapy are not yet defined.

§—Some strains of Treponema pallidum have demonstrated azithromycin resistance; use with caution if penicillin or doxycycline therapy is not possible. It should not be used in men who have sex with men or in pregnant women.

Information from reference 5.

Table 4.   Treatment of Syphilis

View Table

Table 4.

Treatment of Syphilis

Stage Treatment

Primary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

In persons allergic to penicillin:

Doxycycline,* 100 mg orally twice daily for 14 days

Tetracycline,† 500 mg orally four times daily for 14 days

Ceftriaxone (Rocephin),‡ 1 g intravenously or intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

Azithromycin (Zithromax),‡ 2 g orally once

Secondary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

In persons allergic to penicillin:

Doxycycline,* 100 mg orally twice daily for 14 days

Tetracycline,† 500 mg orally four times daily for 14 days

Ceftriaxone,‡ 1 g intravenously or intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

Azithromycin,‡ 2 g orally once

Early latent

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once

Late latent

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly weekly for three weeks

Tertiary

Penicillin G benzathine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly weekly for three weeks

Neurosyphilis

Aqueous crystalline penicillin G, 18 to 24 million units daily administered as 3 to 4 million units intravenously every 4 hours for 10 to 14 days

or

Penicillin G procaine, 2.4 million units intramuscularly once daily for 10 to 14 days

plus

Probenecid, 500 mg orally four times daily for 10 to 14 days

Congenital

Complex treatment

Reference the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention treatment plan at http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/STD-Treatment-2010-RR5912.pdf


*—Preferred alternative treatment in patients with primary or secondary syphilis who are allergic to penicillin.

†—Higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects and less convenient dosing schedule compared with doxycycline.

‡—Optimal dose and duration of therapy are not yet defined.

§—Some strains of Treponema pallidum have demonstrated azithromycin resistance; use with caution if penicillin or doxycycline therapy is not possible. It should not be used in men who have sex with men or in pregnant women.

Information from reference 5.

Patients may develop an acute febrile illness known as the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction during the first 24 hours following initial treatment. This is largely the result of massive lysis of the pathogen, spilling large quantities of inflammatory cytokines into the bloodstream.32 Patients with primary and secondary syphilis who are allergic to penicillin may be treated (with caution and close follow-up) with doxycycline, tetracycline, ceftriaxone (Rocephin), or azithromycin (Zithromax); however, azithromycin is not recommended for pregnant patients or men who have sex with men.5 Penicillin desensitization is recommended for pregnant patients who are allergic to penicillin.5 Sex partners of patients who have syphilis at any stage should be evaluated clinically and serologically, and treated appropriately.5

Data Sources: A PubMed search was completed in Clinical Queries using the key term syphilis. The search included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, prospective studies, case studies, and reviews. Also searched were the Cochrane database, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, UpToDate, and Dynamed. Search date: March 29, 2010.

The Authors

PETER L. MATTEI, MD, is a flight surgeon in the 87th Medical Group at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.

THOMAS M. BEACHKOFSKY, MD, is a flight surgeon in the 8th Medical Group at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea.

ROBERT T. GILSON, MD, FAAD, is an associate professor at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio.

OLIVER J. WISCO, DO, FAAD, is a fellow at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., and a Mohs surgery and melanoma research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, also in Boston.

Address correspondence to Peter L. Mattei, MD, U.S. Air Force, 641 Bainbridge Dr., Mullica Hill, NJ 08062 (e-mail: peterlmattei@gmail.com). Reprints are not available from the authors.

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations to disclose.

The opinions and assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps or the U.S. Air Force at large.

REFERENCES

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Primary and secondary syphilis—United States, 2003–2004. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006;55(10):269–273.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Primary and secondary syphilis—United States, 1999. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2001;50(7):113–117.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends in reportable sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, 2007. http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats07/trends.htm. Accessed November 8, 2011.

4. Miller R, Karras DJ. Commentary. Update on emerging infections: news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Congenital syphilis—United States 2003–2008. Ann Emerg Med. 2010;56(3):296–297.

5. Workowski KA, Berman SM; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2010 [published correction appears in MMWR Recomm Rep. 2011;60(1):18]. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2010;59(RR-12):1–110.

6. Mindel A, Tovey SJ, Timmins DJ, Williams P. Primary and secondary syphilis, 20 years' experience. 2. Clinical features. Genitourin Med. 1989;65(1):1–3.

7. Tucker HA, Mulherin JL. Extragenital chancres; a survey of 219 cases. Am J Syph Gonorrhea Vener Dis. 1948;32(4):345–364.

8. Chapel TA. The variability of syphilitic chancres. Sex Transm Dis. 1978;5(2):68–70.

9. Bi MY, Cohen PR, Robinson FW, Gray JM. Alopecia syphilitica-report of a patient with secondary syphilis presenting as moth-eaten alopecia and a review of its common mimickers. Dermatol Online J. 2009;15(10):6.

10. Lautenschlager S. Cutaneous manifestations of syphilis: recognition and management. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2006;7(5):291–304.

11. Ficarra G, Zaragoza AM, Stendardi L, Parri F, Cockerell CJ. Early oral presentation of lues maligna in a patient with HIV infection. A case report. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1993;75(6):728–732.

12. Carnaúba D Jr, Bittencourt A, Brites C. Atypical presentation of syphilis in an HTLV-I infected patient. Braz J Infect Dis. 2003;7(4):273–277.

13. Rademacher SE, Radolf JD. Prominent osseous and unusual dermatologic manifestations of early syphilis in two patients with discordant serological statuses for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clin Infect Dis. 1996;23(3):462–467.

14. Burdette SD, Waibel JS, Bernstein JM, Trevino JJ. With this eruption, there is not a second to lues. Skinmed. 2005;4(3):179–182.

15. Sands M, Markus A. Lues maligna, or ulceronodular syphilis, in a man infected with human immunodeficiency virus: case report and review. Clin Infect Dis. 1995;20(2):387–390.

16. Patel A, Heath TC, Bowden FJ, Currie B. An unusual presentation of secondary syphilis in the Northern Territory. Australas J Dermatol. 1994;35(1):23–27.

17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Division of STD Prevention. Recommendations for public health surveillance of syphilis in the United States. March 2003. http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphsurvreco.pdf. Accessed March 29, 2010.

18. Gjestland T. The Oslo study of untreated syphilis; an epidemiologic investigation of the natural course of the syphilitic infection based upon a re-study of the Boeck-Bruusgaard material. Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1955;35(suppl 34):3–368, Annex I-LVI.

19. Lafond RE, Lukehart SA. Biological basis for syphilis. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2006;19(1):29–49.

20. Zeltser R, Kurban AK. Syphilis. Clin Dermatol. 2004;22(6):461–468.

21. Woods CR. Congenital syphilis-persisting pestilence. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009;28(6):536–537.

22. Chan DJ. Syphilis and HIV co-infection: when is lumbar puncture indicated? Curr HIV Res. 2005;3(1):95–98.

23. Lynn WA, Lightman S. Syphilis and HIV: a dangerous combination. Lancet Infect Dis. 2004;4(7):456–466.

24. de Almeida SM, Bhatt A, Riggs PK, et al. Cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus viral load in patients with neurosyphilis. J Neurovirol. 2010;16(1):6–12.

25. Ghanem KG, Moore RD, Rompalo AM, Erbelding EJ, Zenilman JM, Gebo KA. Lumbar puncture in HIV-infected patients with syphilis and no neurologic symptoms [published correction appears in Clin Infect Dis. 2009; 48(10):1491]. Clin Infect Dis. 2009;48(6):816–821.

26. Marra CM, Tantalo LC, Sahi SK, Maxwell CL, Lukehart SA. CXCL13 as a cerebrospinal fluid marker for neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients with syphilis. Sex Transm Dis. 2010;37(5):283–287.

27. Manavi K, Young H, McMillan A. The sensitivity of syphilis assays in detecting different stages of early syphilis. Int J STD AIDS. 2006;17(11):768–771.

28. Cummings MC, Lukehart SA, Marra C, et al. Comparison of methods for the detection of Treponema pallidum in lesions of early syphilis. Sex Transm Dis. 1996;23(5):366–369.

29. Romanowski B, Sutherland R, Fick GH, Mooney D, Love EJ. Serologic response to treatment of infectious syphilis. Ann Intern Med. 1991;114(12):1005–1009.

30. Marra CM, Sahi SK, Tantalo LC, et al. Enhanced molecular typing of Treponema pallidum: geographical distribution of strain types and association with neurosyphilis. J Infect Dis. 2010;202(9):1380–1388.

31. Tucker JD, Bu J, Brown LB, Yin YP, Chen XS, Cohen MS. Accelerating worldwide syphilis screening through rapid testing: a systematic review. Lancet Infect Dis. 2010;10(6):381–386.

32. Tramont EC. Treponema pallidum (syphilis). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier/Churchill Livingstone; 2010:3035–3053.



Copyright © 2012 by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
This content is owned by the AAFP. A person viewing it online may make one printout of the material and may use that printout only for his or her personal, non-commercial reference. This material may not otherwise be downloaded, copied, printed, stored, transmitted or reproduced in any medium, whether now known or later invented, except as authorized in writing by the AAFP. Contact afpserv@aafp.org for copyright questions and/or permission requests.

Want to use this article elsewhere? Get Permissions


Article Tools

  • Download PDF
  • Print page
  • Share this page
  • AFP CME Quiz

Information From Industry

More in AFP

More in Pubmed

Navigate this Article