POEMs

Amoxicillin/Clavulanate or Ibuprofen No Better Than Placebo for Acute Bronchitis



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Am Fam Physician. 2014 Feb 1;89(3):225-226.

Clinical Question

In adults with discolored sputum and acute bronchitis, is treatment with amoxicillin/clavulanate (Augmentin) or ibuprofen more effective than placebo in decreasing the number of days with frequent cough?

Bottom Line

Treating acute bronchitis with amoxicillin/clavulanate or the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen is no more effective than placebo in decreasing symptoms in general or duration of frequent cough. Treatment does, however, produce adverse effects in one in eight patients. To quote Osler: “The desire to take medicine is perhaps the greatest feature which distinguishes man from animals.” In that case, prescribing ibuprofen rather than an antibiotic may be the better way to allow patients to take medicine while their cough resolves. (Level of

POEMs (patient-oriented evidence that matters) are provided by Essential Evidence Plus, a point-of-care clinical decision support system published by Wiley-Blackwell. For more information, please see http://www.essentialevidenceplus.com. Copyright Wiley-Blackwell. Used with permission.

For definitions of levels of evidence used in POEMs, see http://www.essentialevidenceplus.com/product/ebm_loe.cfm?show=oxford.

To subscribe to a free podcast of these and other POEMs that appear in AFP, search in iTunes for "Poem of the Week" or go to http://goo.gl/3niWXb.


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