Putting Prevention into Practice

An Evidence-Based Approach

Primary Care Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment



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Am Fam Physician. 2014 Aug 15;90(4):255-256.

  Related U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement: Primary Care Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment: Recommendation Statement

This clinical content conforms to AAFP criteria for continuing medical education (CME). See the CME Quiz Questions.

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

Case Study

A young couple comes to your clinic with their adopted four-year-old daughter for her annual well-child visit. On physical examination, the patient appears to be well developed and well nourished, and measures in the 75th percentile for her height and weight.

Case Study Questions

  1. According to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which of the following risk factors are associated with child maltreatment?

    • A. Older parents.

    • B. Nonbiologic parents.

    • C. Parental stress and distress.

    • D. Family dysfunction or violence.

  2. Which one of the following statements about child maltreatment is correct?

    • A. Most child maltreatment is in the form of neglect.

    • B. Most child maltreatment is in the form of sexual abuse.

    • C. Most child maltreatment is in the form of physical abuse.

    • D. Most deaths from child maltreatment occur in children older than four years.

    • E. The USPSTF recommends interventions to prevent child maltreatment for all children 0 to 18 years of age.

  3. Based on the USPSTF's findings, which one of the following statements is most appropriate for this patient and her family?

    • A. Home visitation is required because the child is adopted and at high risk of maltreatment.

    • B. Primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment should be provided because the benefits exceed the harms in children who

SOURCES

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2013;159(4):289–295.

Selph SS, Bougatsos C, Blazina I, Nelson HD. Behavioral interventions and counseling to prevent child abuse and neglect: a systematic review to update the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158(3):179–190.

The case study and answers to the following questions are based on the recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), an independent panel of experts in primary care and prevention that systematically reviews the evidence of effectiveness and develops recommendations for clinical preventive services. More detailed information on this subject is available in the USPSTF Recommendation Statement and the evidence report on the USPSTF website (http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org). The practice recommendations in this activity are available at http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsfamv.htm.

A collection of Putting Prevention into Practice quizzes published in AFP is available at http://www.aafp.org/afp/ppip.



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