Curbside Consultation

Addressing Suspected Labor Trafficking in the Office

 


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Am Fam Physician. 2015 Dec 15;92(12):1092-1095.

Case Scenario

A 39-year-old woman came to our clinic reporting headaches and bilateral knee pain. The patient was originally from Sri Lanka. She had no health insurance and was accompanied by another woman who seemed to be unrelated and of a different ethnic and socioeconomic status. The other woman insisted on remaining in the examination room with the patient and on responding to my questions, even though the patient was able to understand and speak English. The patient appeared submissive and had a flat affect and downcast eyes throughout the encounter. We suspected the patient was being exploited, perhaps as a result of human trafficking. What can physicians do if we suspect a patient is a victim of human trafficking?

Commentary

Several clues in this scenario suggest that the patient is indeed involved in trafficking. Although sex trafficking has received more media attention, labor trafficking—a form of slavery involving the illegal trade of persons for exploitation or commercial gain—is a big business, generating $150 billion annually.1 Labor trafficking involves the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services through the use of force, threats, violence, fraud, debt bondage, or other forms of coercion.2 Globally, the International Labour Organization estimates that 21 million persons are entrapped in occupations that they are unable to leave.1

An estimated 18,000 persons are trafficked into the United States for labor each year.3 They most commonly originate from Latin America (31%), Southeast Asia (26%), and South Asia (13%), and 71% of persons enter on lawful visas.4 Domestic labor trafficking involves a variety of sectors and industries, including domestic servitude, agriculture, construction, elder care, hospitality, restaurant and food services, janitorial and cleaning services, manufacturing, door-to-door sales, and beauty services.5,6

Health care may be one of the few fields in which professionals are likely to interact with persons who are enslaved.7 About 30% of trafficked persons are exposed to the health care system at some point during their captivity, yet their situation is seldom recognized.8

IDENTIFICATION

Persons who are trafficked for labor include adults, minors, men, women, foreign nationals, and U.S. citizens; they may be challenging to identify, and there is a dearth of validated screening tools.9

Clinicians should note common red flags for trafficking (Table 1).10 These include patients who exhibit a lack of control over their own identification documents or money, or who may have a lack of knowledge about the city they are in or the address where they are staying.3,11,12 Because administrative staff can elucidate whether patients have access to personal forms of identification or familiarity with their personal information, they can alert physicians to patients who appear to be impeded from sharing details about themselves.

View/Print Table

Table 1.

Red Flags and Screening Questions for Suspected Labor Trafficking

Red flags to identify in patients

A foreign national of a country or region known to be involved in trafficking

Accompanied by another person who wants to take charge of the encounter

Works in a sector commonly associated with exploitation or trafficking

Not in possession of identification papers

Not free to come and go as he or she pleases

Works very long hours under unusual restrictions at work

Fearful, anxious, or on-edge

Screening questions for patients

Can you choose to leave your job at any time?

Are you free to come and go as you wish?

Has anyone harmed or threatened you for trying to leave a job?

Has anyone tried to make you feel afraid for your family's safety?

Who do you live with?

Where do you sleep and eat?

Do you owe your employer any money?

Is your passport or identification document kept by another person?


Information from reference 10.

Table 1.

Red Flags and Screening Questions for Suspected Labor Trafficking

Red flags to identify in patients

A foreign national of a country or region known to be involved in trafficking

Accompanied by another person who wants to take charge of the encounter

Works in a sector commonly associated with exploitation or trafficking

Not in possession of identification papers

Not free to come and go as he or she pleases

Works very long hours under unusual restrictions at work

Fearful, anxious, or on-edge

Screening questions for patients

Can you choose to leave your job at any time?

Are you free to come and go as you wish?

Has anyone harmed or threatened you for trying to leave a job?

Has anyone tried to make you feel afraid for your family's safety?

Who do you live with?

Where do you sleep and eat?

Do you owe your employer any money?

Is your passport or identification document kept by another person?


Information from reference 10.

HEALTH IMPACT OF LABOR TRAFFICKING

Physical Health. Labor trafficking victims may experience a multitude of occupational exposures resulting in health issues that prompt them to seek care. En

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

Address correspondence to Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS, FAAFP, at mishorir@georgetown.edu. Reprints are not available from the authors.

REFERENCES

show all references

1. International Labour Organization. ILO says forced labour generates annual profits of US$ 150 billion. May 20, 2014. http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsroom/news/WCMS_243201/lang--en/index.htm. Accessed June 29, 2015....

2. U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Blue Campaign. What is human trafficking? http://www.dhs.gov/definition-human-trafficking. Accessed June 29, 2015.

3. Baldwin SB, Eisenman DP, Sayles JN, Ryan G, Chuang KS. Identification of human trafficking victims in health care settings. Health Hum Rights. 2011;13(1):E36–E49.

4. Owens C, Dank M, Farrell A, et al.; Urban Institute. Understanding the organization, operation, and victimization process of labor trafficking in the United States. http://www.urban.org/research/publication/understanding-organization-operation-and-victimization-process-labor-trafficking-united-states. Accessed June 29, 2015.

5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Refugee Resettlement. Fact sheet: labor trafficking (English). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Homeland Security; August 6, 2012. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/fact-sheet-labor-trafficking-english. Accessed June 29, 2015.

6. National Human Trafficking Resource Center. Labor trafficking. http://www.traffickingresourcecenter.org/type-trafficking/labor-trafficking. Accessed June 29, 2015.

7. Grace AM, Lippert S, Collins K, et al. Educating health care professionals on human trafficking. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2014;30(12):856–861.

8. Becker HJ, Bechtel K. Recognizing victims of human trafficking in the pediatric emergency department. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2015;31(2):144–147.

9. Bespalova N, Morgan J, Coverdale J. A pathway to freedom: an evaluation of screening tools for the identification of trafficking victims [published ahead of print November 15, 2014]. Acad Psychiatry. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40596-014-0245-1 (paid access). Accessed June 29, 2015.

10. U.S. Department of State. Identify and assist a trafficking victim. http://www.state.gov/j/tip/id/. Accessed June 29, 2015.

11. National Human Trafficking Resource Center. Recognizing the signs. http://www.traffickingresourcecenter.org/what-human-trafficking/recognizing-signs. Accessed June 29, 2015.

12. Dovydaitis T. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2010;55(5):462–467.

13. U.S. Department of State. Health consequences of trafficking in persons. Washington, DC: Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons; August 8, 2007. http://2001-2009.state.gov/g/tip/rls/fs/07/91418.htm. Accessed June 29, 2015.

14. Zimmerman C, Schenker MB. Human trafficking for forced labour and occupational health. Occup Environ Med. 2014;71(12):807–808.

15. Zimmerman C, Yun K, Shvab I, et al. The Health Risks and Consequences of Trafficking in Women and Adolescents: Findings from a European Study. London: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; 2003. http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/php/ghd/docs/traffickingfinal.pdf. Accessed June 29, 2015.

16. Oram S, Stöckl H, Busza J, Howard LM, Zimmerman C. Prevalence and risk of violence and the physical, mental, and sexual health problems associated with human trafficking: systematic review. PLoS Med. 2012;9(5):e1001224.

17. Caring for Trafficked Persons: Guidance for Health Providers. IOM Publications http://publications.iom.int/bookstore/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=47&products_id=510. Accessed March 26, 2015.

18. Polaris. Human trafficking assessment for medical professionals. http://traffickingresourcecenter.org/resources/human-trafficking-assessment-medical-professionals. Accessed June 29, 2015.

Case scenarios are written to express typical situations that family physicians may encounter; authors remain anonymous. Send scenarios to afpjournal@aafp.org. Materials are edited to retain confidentiality.

This series is coordinated by Caroline Wellbery, MD, Associate Deputy Editor.

A collection of Curbside Consultation published in AFP is available at http://www.aafp.org/afp/curbside.

Please send scenarios to Caroline Wellbery, MD, at afpjournal@aafp.org. Materials are edited to retain confidentiality.



 

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