Choosing Wisely:

Don’t use skin prick tests or blood tests such as the radioallergosorbent test for the routine evaluation of eczema.

Rationale and Comments: Skin prick tests or blood tests may help identify the causes of allergic reactions, including hives or sneezing after exposure to dust or pollen. However, these tests are not useful for diagnosing dermatitis or eczema. When testing for suspected allergies is deemed necessary in patients with these rashes, it is better to conduct patch testing with ingredients of products that come in contact with the patient’s skin.
Sponsoring Organizations:
  • American Academy of Dermatology
  • Sources:
  • Expert consensus
  • Disciplines:
  • Allergy and immunologic
  • Dermatologic
  • References: • Sidbury R, Tom WL, Bergman JN, Cooper KD, Silverman RA, Berger TG, Chamlin SL, Cohen DE, Cordoro KM, Davis DM, Feldman SR, Hanifin JM, Krol A, Margolis DJ, Paller AS, Schwarzenberger K, Simpson EL, Williams HC, Elmets CA, Block J, Harrod CG, Smith Begolka W, Eichenfield LF. Guidelines of care for the management of atopic dermatitis: Section 4. Prevention of disease flares and use of adjunctive therapies and approaches. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Dec;71(6):1218-33.
    • NIAID-Sponsored Expert Panel, Boyce JA, Assa’ad A, Burks AW, Jones SM, Sampson HA, Wood RA, Plaut M, Cooper SF, Fenton MJ, Arshad SH, Bahna SL, Beck LA, Byrd-Bredbenner C, Camargo CA Jr, Eichenfield L, Furuta GT, Hanifin JM, Jones C, Kraft M, Levy BD, Lieberman P, Luccioli S, McCall KM, Schneider LC, Simon RA, Simons FE, Teach SJ, Yawn BP, Schwaninger JM. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food allergy in the United States: report of the NIAID-sponsored expert panel. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Dec;126(6 Suppl):S1-58.

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