Choosing Wisely:

Don’t routinely use breast MRI for breast cancer screening in average risk women.

Rationale and Comments: MRI screening should be reserved for those at increased risk. Women considered at high risk include: known BRCA gene mutation carriers; first-degree relatives of known BRCA gene mutation carriers; those with a lifetime risk exceeding 20% as measured by risk-assessment tools based primarily on family history of breast cancer; and those with a clinical history associated with a significant risk for breast cancer, including women who received mantle radiation before the age of 30.
Sponsoring Organizations:
  • Society of Surgical Oncology
  • Sources:
  • American Cancer Society guidelines
  • Disciplines:
  • Oncologic
  • Gynecologic
  • Preventive Medicine
  • References: • Saslow D, Boetes C, Burke W, Harms S, Leach MO, Lehman CD, Morris E, Pisano E, Schnall M, Sener S, Smith RA, Warner E, Yaffe M, Andrews KS, Russell CA; American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Advisory Group. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin. 2007 Mar-Apr;57(2):75-89. Erratum in: CA Cancer J Clin. 2007 May-Jun;57(3):185.
    • Mulder RL, Kremer LC, Hudson MM, Bhatia S, Landier W, Levitt G, Constine LS, Wallace WH, van Leeuwen FE, Ronckers CM, Henderson TO, Dwyer M, Skinner R, Oeffinger KC; International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group. Recommendations for breast cancer surveillance for female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer given chest radiation: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group. Lancet Oncol. 2013 Dec;14(13):e621-9.

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