AFP DEPARTMENT COLLECTION

Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

These reports offer succinct summaries of research and perspectives pertinent to family practice advocacy and are produced by the Robert Graham Center: Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care in Washington, DC.

May 15, 2004 Issue
What People Want from Their Family Physician
The public wants and is satisfied by care provided within a patient-physician relationship based on understanding, honesty, and trust. If the U.S. health care system is ever to become patient-centered, it must be designed to support these values and sustain, rather than fracture, the relationships people have with their primary physician.


Dec 15, 2003 Issue
The Ecology of Medical Care for Children in the United States: A New Application of an Old Model Reveals Inequities That Can Be Corrected
If equal and adequate access to health care for children in the United States is a goal, we are failing. That failing is most prominent in the setting where most children receive care and preventive services—the doctor's office.


Oct 15, 2003 Issue
The U.S. Primary Care Physician Workforce: Minimal Growth 1980-1999
Growth in the primary care physician workforce (physicians per capita) in the United States has trailed the growth of the specialist physician population in recent years. This has occurred despite calls during the same period for increased production of primary care physicians and educational reforms focusing on primary care.


Oct 15, 2003 Issue
The U.S. Primary Care Physician Workforce: Persistently Declining Interest in Primary Care Medical Specialties
A persistent, six-year trend in the choice of specialty training by U.S. medical students threatens the adequacy of the physician workforce of the United States. This pattern should be reversed and requires the attention of policy makers and medical educators.


Oct 15, 2003 Issue
The U.S. Primary Care Physician Workforce: Undervalued Service
Primary care physicians work hard, but their compensation is not correlated to their work effort when compared with physicians in other specialties. This disparity contributes to student disinterest in primary care specialties.


Aug 15, 2003 Issue
Family Physicians Are an Important Source of Newborn Care: The Case of the State of Maine
Family physicians (FPs) provided 30 percent of inpatient newborn care in Maine in the year 2000. FPs cared for a large proportion of newborns, especially those insured by Medicaid and in smaller, rural hospitals where FPs also delivered babies. Family medicine's commitment to serve vulnerable populations of newborns requires continued federal, state, and institutional support for training and development of future FPs.


Aug 1, 2003 Issue
Family Physicians Make a Substantial Contribution to Maternity Care: The Case of the State of Maine
Family physicians provided nearly 20 percent of labor and delivery care in Maine in the year 2000. A substantial proportion of this care was provided to women insured by Medicaid and those delivering in smaller, rural hospitals and residency-affiliated hospitals. As family medicine explores its future scope, research identifying regional variations in the maternity care workforce may clarify the need for maternity care training in residency and labor and delivery services in practice.


Apr 1, 2003 Issue
Family Physicians Are an Important Source of Mental Health Care
While comprising about 15 percent of the physician workforce, family physicians provided approximately 20 percent of physician office-based mental health visits in the United States between 1980 and 1999. This proportion has remained stable over the past two decades despite a decline in many other types of office visits to family physicians. Family physicians remain an important source of mental health care for Americans.


Mar 15, 2003 Issue
Family Physicians' Solutions to Common Medical Errors
In two U.S. studies about medical errors in 2000 and 2001, family physicians offered their ideas on how to prevent, avoid, or remedy the five most often reported medical errors. Almost all reports (94 percent) included at least one idea on how to overcome the reported error. These ideas ranged from “do not make errors” (34 percent of all solutions offered to these five error types) to more thoughtfully proposed solutions relating to improved communication mechanisms (30 percent) and ways to provide care differently (26 percent). More education (7 percent) and more resources such as time (2 percent) were other prevention ideas.


Mar 1, 2003 Issue
Consequences of Medical Errors Observed by Family Physicians
In two studies about medical errors, family physicians reported health, time, and financial consequences in nearly 85 percent of their error reports. Health consequences occurred when the error caused pain, extended or created illness, or placed patients, their families, and others at greater risk of harm. Care consequences included delayed diagnosis and treatment (sometimes of serious health conditions such as cancer), and disruptions to care that sometimes even resulted in patients needing care in a hospital. Other important consequences were financial and time costs to patients, health care providers, and the health system generally. However, sometimes no consequence was apparent.


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