ITEMS IN AFP WITH KEYWORD:

Anesthesia

Jun 15, 2014 Issue
Infiltrative Anesthesia in Office Practice [Article]

Learn about the different anesthetic agents and the techniques commonly performed in the office setting, such as local cutaneous infiltration, field blocks, and nerve blocks.


Jan 1, 2005 Issue
Procedural Sedation in the Acute Care Setting [Article]

Many patients require sedation during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Ideally, procedural sedation minimizes the patient's awareness and discomfort while maintaining the patient's safety. Appropriate monitoring by trained personnel is the key to successful procedural sedation. These techniques...


Feb 15, 2004 Issue
Regional Anesthesia For Office Procedures: Part II. Extremity and Inguinal Area Surgeries [Article]

The hand can be anesthetized effectively with blocks of the median, ulnar, or radial nerve. Each digit is supplied by four digital nerves, which can be blocked with injections on each side of the digit. Anterior or posterior ankle blocks can be used for regional anesthesia for the foot. The anterior...


Feb 1, 2004 Issue
Regional Anesthesia For Office Procedures: Part I. Head and Neck Surgeries [Article]

Although local anesthesia usually is used in surgical procedures, field or nerve blocks can provide more effective anesthesia in some situations. In a field block, local anesthetic is infiltrated around the border of the surgical field, leaving the operative area undisturbed. In field blocks, epinep...


May 15, 2003 Issue
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Injection of the Hip and Knee [Article]

Joint injection of the hip and knee regions is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the family physician. In this article, the injection procedure for the greater trochanteric bursa, the knee joint, the pes anserine bursa, the iliotibial band, and the prepatellar bursa is reviewed. Indicatio...


Feb 15, 2003 Issue
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Injection of the Wrist and Hand Region [Article]

Joint injection of the wrist and hand region is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the family physician. In this article, the injection procedures for carpal tunnel syndrome, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint, wrist ganglion cysts, and digital f...


Jul 15, 2002 Issue
Joint and Soft Tissue Injection [Article]

Injection techniques are helpful for diagnosis and therapy in a wide variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Diagnostic indications include the aspiration of fluid for analysis and the assessment of pain relief and increased range of motion as a diagnostic tool. Therapeutic indications include the de...


Jul 1, 2002 Issue
Principles of Office Anesthesia Part II: Topical Anesthesia [Article]

The development of topical anesthetics has provided the family physician with multiple options in anesthetizing open and intact skin. The combination of tetracaine, adrenaline (epinephrine), and cocaine, better known as TAC, was the first topical agent available for analgesia of lacerations to the f...


Jul 1, 2002 Issue
Principles of Office Anesthesia: Part I. Infiltrative Anesthesia [Article]

The use of effective analgesia is vital for any office procedure in which pain may be inflicted. The ideal anesthetic achieves 100 percent analgesia in a short period of time, works on intact or nonintact skin without systemic side effects, and invokes neither pain nor toxicity. Because no single ag...



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