ITEMS IN AFP WITH KEYWORD:

Heart Disease

May 15, 2017 Issue
More Accurate Prediction of the Pretest Probability of Cardiovascular Disease with European Risk Score [POEMs]

The European approach to determining the pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain is superior to that of the Diamond-Forrester approach recommended by U.S. guidelines, and will result in less need for immediate invasive treatment.


May 1, 2017 Issue
Estimating Cardiovascular Risk [Point-of-Care Guides]

The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) depends on accurate estimation of cardiovascular risk. However, a recent systematic review identified 363 prediction models.


Apr 1, 2017 Issue
PCI Has More Benefits and Harms Than CABG for Selected Patients with Left Main Coronary Artery Disease [POEMs]

Patients undergoing PCI had fewer early myocardial infarctions, but more later deaths and later myocardial infarctions. There are other benefits to PCI, including shorter hospital stay, lower cost, and faster recovery. But patients should be informed of the tradeoffs, and it is important to look at longer-term outcomes beyond three years.


Feb 15, 2017 Issue
Aspirin for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: New Recommendations from the USPSTF [Editorials]

In April 2016, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) updated its recommendation on the use of aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Because emerging evidence suggested that aspirin may also be useful for the prevention of cancer, for the first time, the USPSTF developed a recom...


Jan 15, 2017 Issue
Statin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults: Recommendation Statement [U.S. Preventive Services Task Force]

The USPSTF recommends that adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (i.e., symptomatic coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke) use a low- to moderate-dose statin for the prevention of CVD events and mortality when all of the following criteria are met: (1) they are aged 40 to 75 ...


Dec 1, 2016 Issue
Impact of Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation [Cochrane for Clinicians]

Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces cardiovascular mortality and hospitalization. There is no evidence that it reduces the rates of total mortality, myocardial infarctions, coronary artery bypass grafts, or percutaneous coronary interventions.


Oct 15, 2016 Issue
Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer [Putting Prevention into Practice]

S.L. is a 55-year-old man who presents to your office for a routine refill of his antihypertension medication. He also takes a statin and an antidepressant. Although he smokes, his blood pressure and cholesterol are well controlled. His history and physical examination are unremarkable.


Oct 15, 2016 Issue
Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Recommendation Statement [U.S. Preventive Services Task Force]

The USPSTF recommends initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, ...


Jun 15, 2016 Issue
Rapid Protocols to Rule out Myocardial Infarction [Point-of-Care Guides]

Cardiac troponin T and I are released into the bloodstream when cardiac muscle is damaged. Cardiac troponin tests have been available for decades and are the preferred biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, until recently, they lacked sensitivity in the first few hours following an acute myocardial injury.


Jun 1, 2016 Issue
Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention [Article]

Learn which diet and physical activity strategies have the best supporting evidence to prevent the leading causes of death in the United States.


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