Items in AFP with MESH term: Acne Vulgaris

Diagnosis and Treatment of Acne - Article

ABSTRACT: Acne can cause significant embarrassment and anxiety in affected patients. It is important for family physicians to educate patients about available treatment options and their expected outcomes. Topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, sulfacetamide, and azelaic acid are effective in patients with mild or moderate comedones. Topical erythromycin or clindamycin can be added in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory acne or mixed acne. A six-month course of oral erythromycin, doxycycline, tetracycline, or minocycline can be used in patients with moderate to severe inflammatory acne. A low-androgen oral contraceptive pill is effective in women with moderate to severe acne. Isotretinoin is reserved for use in the treatment of the most severe or refractory cases of inflammatory acne. Because of its poor side effect profile and teratogenicity, isotretinoin (Accutane) must by prescribed by a physician who is a registered member of the manufacturer's System to Manage Accutane-Related Teratogenicity program.


Back Rash - Photo Quiz


Topical Therapy for Acne - Article

ABSTRACT: Acne is a common problem in adolescents and young adults. The disorder is caused by abnormal desquamation of follicular epithelium that results in obstruction of the pilosebaceous canal. This obstruction leads to the formation of comedones, which can become inflamed because of overgrowth of Propionibacterium acnes. Topical retinoids such as tretinoin or adapalene are effective in many patients with comedonal acne. Patients with inflammatory lesions benefit from treatment with benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid or topical antibiotics. Frequently, the use of comedonal and antibacterial agents is required.


Use of Systemic Agents in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris - Article

ABSTRACT: Effective treatment of acne vulgaris can prevent emotional and physical scarring. Therapy varies according to the severity of the disease. Topical medication is generally adequate in clearing comedonal acne, while inflammatory acne usually requires the addition of oral medication. Systemic antibiotics are used most frequently and can be highly effective. Newer formulations of combined oral contraceptives are also helpful in modulating sebum production in the female patient. Severe nodulocystic acne that does not respond to topical retinoids and systemic antibiotics may be treated with isotretinoin. However, the side effect profile of this medication is extensive, and physicians should be well-versed in its potential adverse effects.


Family Physicians and Accutane - Editorials


Dermatologic Conditions in Skin of Color: Part I. Special Considerations for Common Skin Disorders - Article

ABSTRACT: Skin of color traditionally refers to that of persons of African, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern, and Hispanic backgrounds. Differences in cutaneous structure and function can result in skin conditions with distinct presentations and varying prevalence that require unique treatment. Skin cancers have different presentations in these populations. The ability to recognize and diagnose skin cancer in a timely manner is important for reducing morbidity and mortality. Basal cell carcinoma often is pigmented, squamous cell carcinoma occurs in areas of chronic scarring and inflammation, and melanoma presents in non–sun-exposed areas, such as the soles and nail beds. Diagnosis requires biopsy, with the technique depending on size and location of the lesion. Treatment options range from topical to surgical. Acne commonly results in postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloids. Combination therapy with topical antibiotics and benzoyl peroxide is generally more effective than monotherapy for treating acne. Use of retinoids at lower concentrations and at less frequent dosing can help prevent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.


Minocycline for Acne Vulgaris - Cochrane for Clinicians



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