Items in AFP with MESH term: Adrenergic beta-Agonists

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Are Oral Betamimetics Effective Maintenance Therapies After Threatened Preterm Labor? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Addition of Long-Acting Beta Agonists for Asthma in Children - Cochrane for Clinicians


Anaphylaxis: Recognition and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that is almost always unanticipated and may lead to death by airway obstruction or vascular collapse. Anaphylaxis occurs as the result of an allergen response, usually immunoglobulin E–mediated, which leads to mast cell and basophil activation and a combination of dermatologic, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic symptoms. Dermatologic and respiratory symptoms are most common, occurring in 90 and 70 percent of episodes, respectively. The three most common triggers are food, insect stings, and medications. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is typically made when symptoms occur within one hour of exposure to a specific antigen. Confirmatory testing using serum histamine and tryptase levels is difficult, because blood samples must be drawn with strict time considerations. Allergen skin testing and in vitro assay for serum immunoglobulin E of specific allergens do not reliably predict who will develop anaphylaxis. Administration of intramuscular epinephrine at the onset of anaphylaxis, before respiratory failure or cardiovascular compromise, is essential. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists and corticosteroids may be useful adjuncts. All patients at risk of recurrent anaphylaxis should be educated about the appropriate use of prescription epinephrine autoinjectors.


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