Items in AFP with MESH term: American Cancer Society

Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Cancer Risk and Improve Outcomes - Article

ABSTRACT: There are more than one half million cancer deaths in the United States each year, and one third of these deaths are attributed to suboptimal diet and physical activity practices. Maintaining a healthy weight, staying physically active throughout life, and consuming a healthy diet can substantially reduce the lifetime risk of developing cancer, as well as influence overall health and survival after a cancer diagnosis. The American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines serve as a source document for communication, policy, and community strategies to improve dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. In 2006, they published updated guidelines for the primary prevention of cancer and guidelines for improving outcomes among cancer survivors through tertiary prevention. These two sets of guidelines have similar recommendations, including: achievement and maintenance of a healthy weight; regular physical activity of at least 30 minutes per day and at least five days per week; a plant-based diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and low in saturated fats and red meats; and moderate alcohol consumption, if at all. Physicians are encouraged to find teachable moments to impart appropriate nutrition, physical activity, and weight management guidance to their patients, and to support policies and programs that can improve these factors in the community to reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes after cancer.


Colonoscopy Surveillance After Polypectomy and Colorectal Cancer Resection - Article

ABSTRACT: This article describes a joint update of guidelines by the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer delineating evidence-based surveillance recommendations for patients after polypectomy and colorectal cancer resection. Although there are some qualifying conditions, the following general guidelines apply: after colonoscopic polypectomy, patients with hyperplastic polyps should be considered to have normal colonoscopies, and subsequent colonoscopy is recommended at 10 years. Patients with one or two small (less than 1 cm) tubular adenomas, including those with only low-grade dysplasia, should have their next colonoscopy in five to 10 years. Patients with three to 10 adenomas, any adenoma 1 cm or larger, or any adenoma with villous features or high-grade dysplasia should have their next colonoscopy in three years. Following curative resection of colorectal cancer, patients should undergo a colonoscopy at one year, with subsequent follow-up intervals determined by the results of this examination. Adoption of these guidelines will have a dramatic impact on the quality of care provided to patients after a colorectal cancer diagnosis, will assist in shifting available resources from intensive surveillance to screening, and will ultimately decrease suffering and death related to colorectal cancer.


Counseling Patients About Prostate Cancer Screening - Editorials


American Cancer Society Issues 2002 Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cancer - Practice Guidelines


ACS Guideline for the Early Detection of Cervical Cancer - Editorials


ACS Releases Updated Guidelines on Cancer Screening - Practice Guidelines


NCCN and ACS Collaborate on a Patient's Version of the NCCN Practice Guidelines for Breast Cancer - Special Medical Reports



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