Items in AFP with MESH term: Amoxicillin

Diagnosis and Treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection - Article

ABSTRACT: Chlamydia trachomatis infection most commonly affects the urogenital tract. In men, the infection usually is symptomatic, with dysuria and a discharge from the penis. Untreated chlamydial infection in men can spread to the epididymis. Most women with chlamydial infection have minimal or no symptoms, but some develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Chlamydial infection in newborns can cause ophthalmia neonatorum. Chlamydial pneumonia can occur at one to three months of age, manifesting as a protracted onset of staccato cough, usually without wheezing or fever. Treatment options for uncomplicated urogenital infections include a single 1-g dose of azithromycin orally, or doxycycline at a dosage of 100 mg orally twice per day for seven days. The recommended treatment during pregnancy is erythromycin base or amoxicillin. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for chlamydial infection in women at increased risk of infection and in all women younger than 25 years.


Diagnosis and Treatment of Otitis Media - Article

ABSTRACT: Diagnostic criteria for acute otitis media include rapid onset of symptoms, middle ear effusion, and signs and symptoms of middle ear inflammation. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are the most common bacterial isolates from the middle ear fluid of children with acute otitis media. Fever, otalgia, headache, irritability, cough, rhinitis, listlessness, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and pulling at the ears are common, but nonspecific symptoms. Detection of middle ear effusion by pneumatic otoscopy is key in establishing the diagnosis. Observation is an acceptable option in healthy children with mild symptoms. Antibiotics are recommended in all children younger than six months, in those between six months and two years if the diagnosis is certain, and in children with severe infection. High-dosage amoxicillin (80 to 90 mg per kg per day) is recommended as first-line therapy. Macrolide antibiotics, clindamycin, and cephalosporins are alternatives in penicillin-sensitive children and in those with resistant infections. Patients who do not respond to treatment should be reassessed. Hearing and language testing is recommended in children with suspected hearing loss or persistent effusion for at least three months, and in those with developmental problems.


Clinical Diagnosis and Evaluation of Sinusitis in Adults - Editorials


An Abscess on the Forehead - Photo Quiz


Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis - Article

ABSTRACT: Perianal streptococcal dermatitis is a bright red, sharply demarcated rash that is caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Symptoms include perianal rash, itching and rectal pain; blood-streaked stools may also be seen in one third of patients. It primarily occurs in children between six months and 10 years of age and is often misdiagnosed and treated inappropriately. A rapid streptococcal test of suspicious areas can confirm the diagnosis. Routine skin culture is an alternative diagnostic aid. Treatment with amoxicillin or penicillin is effective. Follow-up is necessary, because recurrences are common.


Acute Otitis Media Caused by Resistant Pneumococci - Editorials


Controversy in Otitis Media Management: Should We Follow the CDC Recommendations? - Editorials



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