Items in AFP with MESH term: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

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Angiotensin Blockade in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Secondary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. In patients who have had a myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, secondary prevention of coronary artery disease by comprehensive risk factor modification reduces mortality, decreases subsequent cardiac events, and improves quality of life. Options for secondary prevention include medical therapy and surgical revascularization in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention. Medical therapy focuses on comprehensive risk factor modification. Therapeutic lifestyle changes (including weight management, physical activity, tobacco cessation, and dietary modification) improve cardiac risk factors and are universally recommended by evidence-based guidelines. Treatment of hypertension and dyslipidemia reduces morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for persons with diabetes mellitus generally encourage glucose control, but current evidence has not shown reductions in mortality with intensive glucose management. Aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta blockers reduce recurrent cardiac events in patients after myocardial infarction. Surgical revascularization by coronary artery bypass grafting is recommended for those with significant left main coronary artery stenosis, significant stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending artery, multivessel coronary disease, or disabling angina. Percutaneous coronary intervention may be considered in select patients with objective evidence of ischemia demonstrated by noninvasive testing.


Transient Ischemic Attacks: Part II. Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Risk factors for stroke should be evaluated in patients who have had a transient ischemic attack. Blood pressure, lipid levels, and diabetes mellitus should be controlled. When applicable, smoking cessation and weight loss also are important. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy may help prevent stroke. Aspirin is the treatment of choice for stroke prevention in patients who do not require anticoagulation. Clopidogrel is an alternative therapy in patients who do not tolerate aspirin. Atrial fibrillation, a known cardioembolic source (confirmed thrombus), or a highly suspected cardioembolic source (e.g., recent large myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, mechanical valve, rheumatic mitral valve stenosis) are indications for anticoagulation.


First-Line Treatment for Hypertension - Cochrane for Clinicians


Acutely Swollen Tongue in a Middle-Aged Woman - Photo Quiz


ACE Inhibitor Therapy: Benefits and Underuse - Editorials


Treatment Guidelines for Heart Failure Stress Multidrug Approach - Special Medical Reports


Diabetic Nephropathy--The Family Physician's Role - Article

ABSTRACT: Nearly one-half of persons with chronic kidney disease have diabetes mellitus. Diabetes accounted for 44 percent of new cases of kidney failure in 2008. Diabetic nephropathy, also called diabetic kidney disease, is associated with significant macrovascular risk, and is the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy usually manifests after 10 years’ duration of type 1 diabetes, but may be present at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Screening for microalbuminuria should be initiated five years after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Screening for microalbuminuria with a spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio identifies the early stages of nephropathy. Positive results on two of three tests (30 to 300 mg of albumin per g of creatinine) in a six-month period meet the diagnostic criteria for diabetic nephropathy. Because diabetic nephropathy may also manifest as a decreased glomerular filtration rate or an increased serum creatinine level, these tests should be included in annual monitoring. Preventive measures include using an angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker in normotensive persons. Optimizing glycemic control and using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker to control blood pressure slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy, but implementing intensive glycemic and blood pressure control is associated with more adverse outcomes. Low-protein diets may also decrease adverse renal outcomes and mortality in persons with diabetic nephropathy.


Adding ACE Inhibitors or ARBs to Standard Therapy for Stable Ischemic Heart Disease - Implementing AHRQ Effective Health Care Reviews


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