Items in AFP with MESH term: Anti-Inflammatory Agents

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Evidence for the Use of Intramuscular Injections in Outpatient Practice - Article

ABSTRACT: There are few studies comparing the outcomes of patients who are treated with oral versus intramuscular antibiotics, corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or vitamin B12. This may lead to confusion about when the intramuscular route is indicated. For example, intramuscular ceftriaxone for Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection and intramuscular penicillin G benzathine for Treponema pallidum infection are the treatments of choice. However, oral antibiotics are the treatment of choice for the outpatient treatment of pneumonia and most other outpatient bacterial infections. Oral corticosteroids are as effective as intramuscular corticosteroids and are well-tolerated by most patients. High daily doses of oral vitamin B12 with ongoing clinical surveillance appear to be as effective as intramuscular treatment. Few data support choosing intramuscular ketorolac over an oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug unless the patient is unable to tolerate an oral medication. For other indications, the intramuscular route should be considered only when the delivery of a medication must be confirmed, such as when a patient cannot tolerate an oral medication, or when compliance is uncertain.


Recognition and Management of Exercise-Induced Brochospasm - Article

ABSTRACT: Exercise-induced bronchospasm is an obstruction of transient airflow that usually occurs five to 15 minutes after physical exertion. Although this condition is highly preventable, it is still underrecognized and affects aerobic fitness and quality of life. Diagnosis is based on the results of a detailed history, including assessment of asthma triggers, symptoms suggestive of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and a normal forced expiratory volume at one second at rest. A trial of therapy with an inhaled beta agonist may be instituted, with the subsequent addition of inhaled anti-inflammatory agents or ipratropium bromide. Nonpharmacologic measures, such as increased physical conditioning, warm-up exercises, and covering the mouth and nose, should be instituted. If symptoms persist, pulmonary function testing is warranted to rule out underlying lung disease.


Facial Rash - Photo Quiz


Upper Respiratory Tract Infection - Clinical Evidence Handbook


Infected Welding Burns - Photo Quiz


Which Nonsurgical Treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Are Beneficial? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Cutaneous Manifestation of a Systemic Disease - Photo Quiz


Acute Red Eye - Photo Quiz


Management of Influenza - Article

ABSTRACT: Influenza is a contagious airborne viral illness characterized by abrupt onset of symptoms. Fever, myalgia, headache, rhinitis, sore throat, and cough are commonly reported symptoms. The diagnosis should be made clinically, and the decision to begin antiviral therapy should not be delayed for laboratory confirmation of influenza. The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus is expected to continue to circulate during the 2010-2011 season, but it is not certain whether it will replace or cocirculate with seasonal influenza A subtypes that have been circulating since 1977. The 2009 H1N1 virus is largely resistant to adamantanes, but it is sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir. Neuraminidase inhibitors have modest effectiveness in reducing influenza-related symptoms in patients at low risk of complications. Patients at high risk of complications, including pregnant women, should be treated with antiviral agents, preferably within 48 hours of symptom onset. Family physicians should follow guidelines from the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention when treating patients with influenza or influenza-like symptoms.


Topical Psoriasis Therapy - Article

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common dermatosis, affecting from 1 to 3 percent of the population. Until recently, the mainstays of topical therapy have been corticosteroids, tars, anthralins and keratolytics. Recently, however, vitamin D analogs, a new anthralin preparation and topical retinoids have expanded physicians' therapeutic armamentarium. These new topical therapies offer increased hope and convenience to the large patient population with psoriasis.


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