Items in AFP with MESH term: Anticonvulsants

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Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain - Article

ABSTRACT: Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain affects the functionality, mood, and sleep patterns of approximately 10 to 20 percent of patients with diabetes mellitus. Treatment goals include restoring function and improving pain control. Patients can realistically expect a 30 to 50 percent reduction in discomfort with improved functionality. The main classes of agents used to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain include tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, opiates and opiate-like substances, and topical medications. Physicians should ask patients whether they have tried complementary and alternative medicine therapies for their pain. Only two medications are approved specifically for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: pregabalin and duloxetine. However, evidence supports the use of other therapies, and unless there are contraindications, tricyclic antidepressants are the first-line treatment. Because patients often have multiple comorbidities, physicians must consider potential adverse effects and possible drug interactions before prescribing a medication.


Usefulness of Measuring Antiepileptic Medication Blood Levels in Patients with Epilepsy - Cochrane for Clinicians


Magnesium Sulfate and Other Anticonvulsants for Women with Preeclampsia - Cochrane for Clinicians


New Guidelines Offer Recommendations for Women with Epilepsy - Special Medical Reports


Neurologic Group Develops Recommendations for Management of Epilepsy - Special Medical Reports


Guidelines on Migraine: Part 5. Recommendations for Specific Prophylactic Drugs - Practice Guidelines


Febrile Seizures: Risks, Evaluation, and Prognosis - Article

ABSTRACT: Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and electroencephalography are not recommended, and lumbar puncture is no longer recommended in patients with uncomplicated febrile seizures. In the unusual case of febrile status epilepticus, intravenous lorazepam and buccal midazolam are first-line agents. After an initial febrile seizure, physicians should reassure parents about the low risk of long-term effects, including neurologic sequelae, epilepsy, and death. However, there is a 15 to 70 percent risk of recurrence in the first two years after an initial febrile seizure. This risk is increased in patients younger than 18 months and those with a lower fever, short duration of fever before seizure onset, or a family history of febrile seizures. Continuous or intermittent antiepileptic or antipyretic medication is not recommended for the prevention of recurrent febrile seizures.


Dietary Management of Epilepsy - Editorials


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