Items in AFP with MESH term: Antidepressive Agents

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AAP Guidelines on Treatment of Children with ADHD - Practice Guidelines


Depressive Disorders - Clinical Evidence Handbook


Antidepressants for Generalized Anxiety Disorder - Cochrane for Clinicians


Which Antidepressant Is Best to Avoid Sexual Dysfunction? - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Antidepressant Medications in Pregnancy - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Antidepressants and Smoking Cessation - Cochrane for Clinicians


Medications in the Breast-Feeding Mother - Article

ABSTRACT: Prescribing medications for a breast-feeding mother requires weighing the benefits of medication use for the mother against the risk of not breast-feeding the infant or the potential risk of exposing the infant to medications. A drug that is safe for use during pregnancy may not be safe for the nursing infant. The transfer of medications into breast milk depends on a concentration gradient that allows passive diffusion of nonionized, non-protein-bound drugs. The infant's medication exposure can be limited by prescribing medications to the breast-feeding mother that are poorly absorbed orally, by avoiding breast-feeding during times of peak maternal serum drug concentration and by prescribing topical therapy when possible. Mothers of premature or otherwise compromised infants may require altered dosing to avoid drug accumulation and toxicity in these infants. The most accurate and up-to-date sources of information, including Internet resources and telephone consultations, should be used.


Assessment and Treatment of Depression Following Myocardial Infarction - Article

ABSTRACT: Approximately 65 percent of patients with acute myocardial infarction report experiencing symptoms of depression. Major depression is present in 15 to 22 percent of these patients. Depression is an independent risk factor in the development of and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in otherwise healthy persons. Persons who are depressed and who have pre-existing cardiovascular disease have a 3.5 times greater risk of death than patients who are not depressed and have cardiovascular disease. Physicians can assess patients for depression by using one of several easily administered and scored self-report inventories, including the SIG E CAPS + mood mnemonic. Cognitive-behavior therapy is the preferred psychologic treatment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are the recommended pharmacologic treatment because of the relative absence of effects on the cardiovascular system. The combination of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with cognitive-behavior therapy is often the most effective treatment for depression in patients with cardiovascular disease.


Antidepressants: Update on New Agents and Indications - Article

ABSTRACT: A number of antidepressants have emerged in the U.S. market in the past two decades. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have become the drugs of choice in the treatment of depression, and they are also effective in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia. New indications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors include post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Extended-release venlafaxine has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Mirtazapine, which is unrelated to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, is unique in its action--stimulating the release of norepinephrine and serotonin. The choice of antidepressant drug depends on the agent's pharmacologic profile, secondary actions, and tolerability. Sexual dysfunction related to the use of antidepressants may be addressed by reducing the dosage, switching to another agent, or adding another drug to overcome the sexual side effects. Augmentation with lithium or triiodothyronine may be useful in patients who are partially or totally resistant to antidepressant treatment. Finally, tapering antidepressant medication may help to avoid discontinuation syndrome or antidepressant withdrawal.


Depression in Later Life: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge - Article

ABSTRACT: Depression in elderly persons is widespread, often undiagnosed, and usually untreated. The current system of care is fragmented and inadequate, and staff at residential and other facilities often are ill-equipped to recognize and treat patients with depression. Because there is no reliable diagnostic test, a careful clinical evaluation is essential. Depressive illness in later life should be treated with antidepressants that are appropriate for use in geriatric patients. A comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach, including consideration of electroconvulsive treatment in some cases, is important. The overall long-term prognosis for elderly depressed patients is good.


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