Items in AFP with MESH term: Antidepressive Agents

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Antidepressants and Antiepileptic Drugs for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain - Article

ABSTRACT: The development of newer classes of antidepressants and second-generation antiepileptic drugs has created unprecedented opportunities for the treatment of chronic pain. These drugs modulate pain transmission by interacting with specific neurotransmitters and ion channels. The actions of antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs differ in neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain, and agents within each medication class have varying degrees of efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, nortriptyline, desipramine) and certain novel antidepressants (i.e., bupropion, venlafaxine, duloxetine) are effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesic effect of these drugs is independent of their antidepressant effect and appears strongest in agents with mixed-receptor or predominantly noradrenergic activity, rather than serotoninergic activity. First-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., carbamazepine, phenytoin) and second-generation antiepileptic drugs (e.g., gabapentin, pregabalin) are effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The efficacy of antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain is comparable; tolerability also is comparable, but safety and side effect profiles differ. Tricyclic antidepressants are the most cost-effective agents, but second-generation antiepileptic drugs are associated with fewer safety concerns in elderly patients. Tricyclic antidepressants have documented (although limited) efficacy in the treatment of fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. Recent evidence suggests that duloxetine and pregabalin have modest efficacy in patients with fibromyalgia.


Pharmacologic Management of Adult Depression - Article

ABSTRACT: Major depression is a common and treatable disease. Many patients benefit from pharmacologic treatment and, because there is little variation in antidepressant effectiveness, medication choices should be made based on patient characteristics, safety, and anticipated side effects. Most patients respond favorably to treatment, but many do not have complete symptom relief. Changing medications or augmenting with a second medication is helpful for some partial or nonresponders. All antidepressants are capable of producing harmful side effects, and some are particularly prone to dangerous drug-drug interactions. The risk of suicide is always a concern in depression and this risk is not necessarily reduced by the use of antidepressants. Some persons may have an increase in suicidal thoughts with antidepressant treatment. Close follow-up is required when initiating therapy and adjusting dosages.


Antidepressants to Treat Nonspecific Low Back Pain - Cochrane for Clinicians


Generalized Anxiety Disorder - Clinical Evidence Handbook


St. John's Wort for Depression - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Counseling or Antidepressants for Treating Depression? - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Depressive Disorders - Clinical Evidence Handbook


Pharmacologic Treatment of Psychotic Depression - Cochrane for Clinicians


Psychosocial Interventions Delivered by Primary Care Physicians to Patients with Depression - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Antidepressants in Older Persons - Cochrane for Clinicians


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