Items in AFP with MESH term: Antidotes

AAP Releases Policy Statement on Poison Treatment in the Home - Practice Guidelines


Evaluation and Management of Common Childhood Poisonings - Article

ABSTRACT: Family physicians often manage substance ingestions in children, most of which are nontoxic in nature. Physicians should know the phone number of the poison control center, understand the appropriate initial assessment of suspected toxin ingestion, and recognize important toxidromes. Rapid triage is crucial, including airway, respiration, and circulation stabilization. Appropriate supportive or toxin-specific treatment should be initiated. Gastric decontamination, such as activated charcoal and gastric lavage, are no longer routinely recommended. These methods should be reserved for the most severe cases, with poison control center support. The use of ipecac is no longer recommended. A child with few symptoms or a witnessed toxin exposure may be monitored at home. However, some long-acting medications have delayed toxin effects and require additional surveillance.


Treatment of Ethylene Glycol Poisoning - Article

ABSTRACT: Ingestion of ethylene glycol may be an important contributor in patients with metabolic acidosis of unknown cause and subsequent renal failure. Expeditious diagnosis and treatment will limit metabolic toxicity and decrease morbidity and mortality. Ethylene glycol poisoning should be suspected in an intoxicated patient with anion gap acidosis, hypocalcemia, urinary crystals, and nontoxic blood alcohol concentration. Fomepizole is a newer agent with a specific indication for the treatment of ethylene glycol poisoning. Metabolic acidosis is resolved within three hours of initiating therapy. Initiation of fomepizole therapy before the serum creatinine concentration rises can minimize renal impairment. Compared with traditional ethanol treatment, advantages of fomepizole include lack of depression of the central nervous system and hypoglycemia, and easier maintenance of effective plasma levels.


N-Acetylcysteine: Multiple Clinical Applications - Article

ABSTRACT: N-acetylcysteine is the acetylated variant of the amino acid L-cysteine and is widely used as the specific antidote for acetaminophen overdose. Other applications for N-acetylcysteine supplementation supported by scientific evidence include prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, prevention of contrast-induced kidney damage during imaging procedures, attenuation of illness from the influenza virus when started before infection, treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, and treatment of infertility in patients with clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome. Preliminary studies suggest that N-acetylcysteine may also have a role as a cancer chemopreventive, an adjunct in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori, and prophylaxis of gentamicin-induced hearing loss in patients on renal dialysis.


Oral Poisonings: Guidelines for Initial Evaluation and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: The initial evaluation and management of poisoned patients should be comprehensive and include an accurate history whenever possible, stabilization of the patient's condition, a physical assessment to evaluate the extent of poisoning and the presence of concurrent conditions, decontamination of the gastrointestinal tract using activated charcoal, gastric lavage, administration of ipecac or irrigation, poison-specific treatment with administration of antidotes when indicated and proper disposition. Consultation with a poison control center is often helpful in assessing and treating these patients.



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