Items in AFP with MESH term: Antifungal Agents

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Diagnosis and Management of Common Tinea Infections - Article

ABSTRACT: The estimated lifetime risk of acquiring a dermatophyte infection is between 10 and 20 percent. Recognition and appropriate treatment of these infections reduces both morbidity and discomfort and lessens the possibility of transmission. Dermatophyte infections are classified according to the affected body site, such as tinea capitis (scalp), tinea barbae (beard area), tinea corporis (skin other than bearded area, scalp, groin, hands or feet), tinea cruris (groin, perineum and perineal areas), tinea pedis (feet), tinea manuum (hands) and tinea unguium (nails). To determine the best treatment approach, the physician must consider several factors: (1) the anatomic locations of the infection, (2) the safety, efficacy and cost of treatment options and (3) the likelihood that the patient will comply with treatment. Newer medications in both oral and topical forms, including imidazoles and allylamines, have greatly increased the cure rate for tinea infections. Certain types of tinea may be treated with "pulse" regimens; these innovative therapies lower treatment costs and improve patient compliance.


Diagnosis of Vaginitis - Article

ABSTRACT: Vaginitis is the most common gynecologic diagnosis in the primary care setting. In approximately 90 percent of affected women, this condition occurs secondary to bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis or trichomoniasis. Vaginitis develops when the vaginal flora has been altered by introduction of a pathogen or by changes in the vaginal environment that allow pathogens to proliferate. The evaluation of vaginitis requires a directed history and physical examination, with focus on the site of involvement and the characteristics of the vaginal discharge. The laboratory evaluation includes microscopic examination of a saline wet-mount preparation and a potassium hydroxide preparation, a litmus test for the pH of vaginal secretions and a "whiff" test. Metronidazole is the primary treatment for bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis. Topical antifungal agents are the first-line treatments for candidal vaginitis.


Differential Diagnosis of Annular Lesions - Article

ABSTRACT: Although most annular lesions will be typical of a dermatophytosis, physicians must consider other possible diagnoses. Tinea corporis can often be diagnosed on the basis of a positive potassium hydroxide examination. Topical and systemic antifungals are usually curative. Pityriasis rosea is characterized by small, fawn-colored lesions distributed along skin cleavage lines. Treatment is symptomatic. Granuloma annulare is characterized by nonscaly, annular plaques with indurated borders, typically on the extremities. One half of cases resolve spontaneously within two years. Sarcoidosis can present as annular, indurated plaques similar in appearance to the lesions of granuloma annulare. Diagnosis is based on histopathology and the involvement of other organ systems. Hansen's disease can mimic tinea corporis by presenting as one or more annular, sometimes scaly, plaques. Urticaria may affect 10 to 20 percent of the population. The annular plaques lack scale and are evanescent. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus can present in an annular form on sun-exposed surfaces or in a papulosquamous form. Erythema annulare centrifugum typically presents as annular patches with trailing scale inside erythematous borders.


A Revealing Stain - Photo Quiz


Onychomycosis: Current Trends in Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nails that causes discoloration, thickening, and separation from the nail bed. Onychomycosis occurs in 10% of the general population, 20% of persons older than 60 years, and 50% of those older than 70 years. It is caused by a variety of organisms, but most cases are caused by dermatophytes. Accurate diagnosis involves physical and microscopic examination and culture. Histologic evaluation using periodic acid–Schiff staining increases sensitivity for detecting infection. Treatment is aimed at eradication of the causative organism and return to a normal appearance of the nail. Systemic antifungals are the most effective treatment, with meta-analyses showing mycotic cure rates of 76% for terbinafine, 63% for itraconazole with pulse dosing, 59% for itraconazole with continuous dosing, and 48% for fluconazole. Concomitant nail debridement further increases cure rates. Topical therapy with ciclopirox is less effective; it has a failure rate exceeding 60%. Several nonprescription treatments have also been evaluated. Laser and photodynamic therapies show promise based on in-vitro evaluation, but more clinical studies are needed. Despite treatment, the recurrence rate of onychomycosis is 10% to 50% as a result of reinfection or lack of mycotic cure.


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