Items in AFP with MESH term: Antioxidants

Primary Prevention of CHD: Nine Ways to Reduce Risk - Article

ABSTRACT: Lowering cholesterol can reduce the incidence of coronary heart disease. Treating hypertension reduces overall mortality and is most effective in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease in older patients. Smoking cessation reduces the level of risk to that of nonsmokers within about three years of cessation. Aspirin is likely to be an effective means of primary prevention, but a group in whom treatment is appropriate has yet to be defined. Evidence that supplementation with vitamin A or C reduces the risk of coronary heart disease is inadequate; the data for use of vitamin E are inconclusive. Epidemiologic evidence is sufficient to recommend that most persons increase their levels of physical activity. Lowering homocysteine levels through increased folate intake is a promising but unproven primary prevention strategy. Hormone replacement therapy was associated with reduced incidence of coronary heart disease in epidemiologic studies but was not effective in a secondary prevention trial.


Contemporary Management of Angina: Part II. Medical Management of Chronic Stable Angina - Article

ABSTRACT: Except for a small subset of patients with angina whose survival is improved with coronary artery bypass surgery, chronic stable angina can be appropriately managed with medical therapy in the vast majority of patients. Drug therapy includes aspirin, beta-adrenergic blockers, cholesterol-lowering agents and other anti-ischemic drugs that can ameliorate angina and improve the patient's quality of life. Understanding how and when to use these medicines involves knowledge of the mechanisms of these drugs as well as familiarity with the literature supporting their efficacy in various patient populations.


Antioxidant Vitamins and the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Clinical use of antioxidant vitamin supplementation may help to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD). Epidemiologic studies find lower CHD morbidity and mortality in persons who consume larger quantities of antioxidants in foods or supplements. Clinical trials indicate that supplementation with certain nutrients is beneficial in reducing the incidence of CHD events. Recent studies show that supplementation with antioxidant vitamins E and C have benefits in CHD prevention; however, supplementation with beta-carotene may have deleterious effects and is not recommended. Current evidence suggests that patients with CHD would probably benefit from taking vitamin E in a dosage of 400 IU per day and vitamin C in a dosage of 500 to 1,000 mg per day. Clinicians may also want to consider vitamin supplementation for CHD prevention in high-risk patients. Folate lowers elevated homocysteine levels, but evidence for routine supplemental use does not yet exist. Other nutritional supplements are currently under investigation.


Antioxidant Supplements Do Not Improve Mortality and May Cause Harm - Cochrane for Clinicians


Do Vitamin C Supplements Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Mortality? - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Routine Vitamin Supplementation to Prevent Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease - Putting Prevention into Practice


Efficacy of Antioxidants in GI Cancer Prevention - Cochrane for Clinicians


Pharmacologic Treatment of Hyperlipidemia - Article

ABSTRACT: Pharmacologic treatment of hyperlipidemia in conjunction with therapeutic lifestyle changes can be used for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Statins have the most convincing data for primary prevention, especially for higher risk patients. Therefore, risk stratification is essential. Statin therapy is also recommended for secondary prevention in all patients with known cardiovascular disease or the risk equivalent. High-dose statins should be initiated in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Omega-3 fatty acids may be a good alternative after myocardial infarction for patients who cannot tolerate statins. Fibrates and niacin have not been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in secondary prevention, but may be useful adjuncts when statins alone cannot adequately con- trol lipid levels. Other cholesterol-lowering medications used for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease have not been shown to consistently improve patient-oriented outcomes. There is good evidence for using statins in the secondary prevention of stroke and peripheral arterial disease.


The Value of Antioxidant Vitamin Supplements - Editorials



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