Items in AFP with MESH term: Athletic Injuries

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Health-Related Concerns of the Female Athlete: A Lifespan Approach - Article

ABSTRACT: Exercise is beneficial for women of all ages and is associated with long-term health benefits and enhanced well-being. Nevertheless, active women and girls are at risk for conditions resulting from sports and exercise participation. Because of their unique physiology, children are more susceptible to heat illness than adolescents and younger adults. Childhood sports injuries tend to involve the growth plate. Adolescents share some concerns with child athletes but have injuries more similar to those that occur in adults, especially ligament and tendon injuries. Adolescents and adult women are at risk for anterior cruciate ligament injuries, patellofemoral pain syndrome, and stress fractures. For athletes in these age groups, physicians should screen for pelvic floor dysfunction and the female athlete triad, especially in patients with a history of stress fractures. In adult women, exercise can contribute to disease prevention and management. Continuation of an appropriate exercise routine helps older women maintain independence and prevent falls.


New Challenges in Assessing and Managing Concussion in Sports - Editorials


Lateral Knee Pain after Aerobic Exercise - Photo Quiz


Current Understanding of Tendinopathies and Treatment Options - Editorials


Peripheral Nerve Entrapment and Injury in the Upper Extremity - Article

ABSTRACT: Peripheral nerve injury of the upper extremity commonly occurs in patients who participate in recreational (e.g., sports) and occupational activities. Nerve injury should be considered when a patient experiences pain, weakness, or paresthesias in the absence of a known bone, soft tissue, or vascular injury. The onset of symptoms may be acute or insidious. Nerve injury may mimic other common musculoskeletal disorders. For example, aching lateral elbow pain may be a symptom of lateral epicondylitis or radial tunnel syndrome; patients who have shoulder pain and weakness with overhead elevation may have a rotator cuff tear or a suprascapular nerve injury; and pain in the forearm that worsens with repetitive pronation activities may be from carpal tunnel syndrome or pronator syndrome. Specific history features are important, such as the type of activity that aggravates symptoms and the temporal relation of symptoms to activity (e.g., is there pain in the shoulder and neck every time the patient is hammering a nail, or just when hammering nails overhead?). Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging are usually not necessary for initial evaluation of a suspected nerve injury. When pain or weakness is refractory to conservative therapy, further evaluation (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging, electrodiagnostic testing) or surgical referral should be considered. Recovery of nerve function is more likely with a mild injury and a shorter duration of compression. Recovery is faster if the repetitive activities that exacerbate the injury can be decreased or ceased. Initial treatment for many nerve injuries is nonsurgical.


Reducing ACL Injuries in Female Athletes - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Current Concepts in Concussion: Evaluation and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Concussion is a disturbance in brain function caused by direct or indirect force to the head. It is a functional rather than structural injury that results from shear stress to brain tissue caused by rotational or angular forces—direct impact to the head is not required. Initial evaluation involves eliminating cervical spine injury and serious traumatic brain injury. Headache is the most common symptom of concussion, although a variety of clinical domains (e.g., somatic, cognitive, affective) can be affected. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific; therefore, a temporal relationship between an appropriate mechanism of injury and symptoms must be determined. There are numerous assessment tools to aid diagnosis, including symptom checklists, neuropsychological tests, postural stability tests, and sideline assessment tools. These tools are also used to monitor recovery. Cognitive and physical rest are the cornerstones of initial management. There are no specific treatments for concussion; therefore, focus is on managing symptoms and return to play. Because concussion recovery is variable, rigid classification systems have mostly been abandoned in favor of an individualized approach. A graded return-to-play protocol can be implemented once a patient has recovered in all affected domains. Children, adolescents, and those with a history of concussions may require a longer recovery period. There is limited research on the management of concussions in children and adolescents, but concern for potential consequences of injury to the developing brain suggests that a more conservative approach to management is appropriate in these patients.


Cognitive Rest in Concussion Management - Editorials


Evaluation and Management of Concussion in Athletes: Recommendations from the AAN - Practice Guidelines


Common Conditions in the Overhead Athlete - Article

ABSTRACT: The overhead athlete is at unique risk for injury because of the mechanics associated with rapid shoulder elevation, abduction, and external rotation. Angulation of the humeral head against the posterosuperior glenoid can cause rotator cuff tendon and labral impingement. The throwing or striking motion of baseball, softball, water polo, tennis, racquetball, and volleyball may result in scapular dyskinesis, partial articular-sided supraspinatus avulsions, and posterosuperior labral tears. The SICK scapula syndrome (scapular malposition, inferior medial border prominence, coracoid pain and malposition, and dyskinesis of scapular movement) is thought to increase the risk of injury in the overhead athlete. Special physical examination maneuvers and magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in diagnosing intra-articular pathology. Rehabilitation of injuries associated with internal impingement of the shoulder should include three basic components: strengthening, stretching, and sport-specific exercises. Arthroscopic surgery may be considered if symptoms do not improve after three months of conservative management.


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