Items in AFP with MESH term: Athletic Injuries

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Concussion in Sports - Editorials


Physical Examination for the Special Olympics - Editorials


Lateral Knee Pain after Aerobic Exercise - Photo Quiz


Current Understanding of Tendinopathies and Treatment Options - Editorials


New Challenges in Assessing and Managing Concussion in Sports - Editorials


Reducing ACL Injuries in Female Athletes - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Current Concepts in Concussion: Evaluation and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Concussion is a disturbance in brain function caused by direct or indirect force to the head. It is a functional rather than structural injury that results from shear stress to brain tissue caused by rotational or angular forces—direct impact to the head is not required. Initial evaluation involves eliminating cervical spine injury and serious traumatic brain injury. Headache is the most common symptom of concussion, although a variety of clinical domains (e.g., somatic, cognitive, affective) can be affected. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific; therefore, a temporal relationship between an appropriate mechanism of injury and symptoms must be determined. There are numerous assessment tools to aid diagnosis, including symptom checklists, neuropsychological tests, postural stability tests, and sideline assessment tools. These tools are also used to monitor recovery. Cognitive and physical rest are the cornerstones of initial management. There are no specific treatments for concussion; therefore, focus is on managing symptoms and return to play. Because concussion recovery is variable, rigid classification systems have mostly been abandoned in favor of an individualized approach. A graded return-to-play protocol can be implemented once a patient has recovered in all affected domains. Children, adolescents, and those with a history of concussions may require a longer recovery period. There is limited research on the management of concussions in children and adolescents, but concern for potential consequences of injury to the developing brain suggests that a more conservative approach to management is appropriate in these patients.


Cognitive Rest in Concussion Management - Editorials


Common Conditions in the Overhead Athlete - Article

ABSTRACT: The overhead athlete is at unique risk for injury because of the mechanics associated with rapid shoulder elevation, abduction, and external rotation. Angulation of the humeral head against the posterosuperior glenoid can cause rotator cuff tendon and labral impingement. The throwing or striking motion of baseball, softball, water polo, tennis, racquetball, and volleyball may result in scapular dyskinesis, partial articular-sided supraspinatus avulsions, and posterosuperior labral tears. The SICK scapula syndrome (scapular malposition, inferior medial border prominence, coracoid pain and malposition, and dyskinesis of scapular movement) is thought to increase the risk of injury in the overhead athlete. Special physical examination maneuvers and magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in diagnosing intra-articular pathology. Rehabilitation of injuries associated with internal impingement of the shoulder should include three basic components: strengthening, stretching, and sport-specific exercises. Arthroscopic surgery may be considered if symptoms do not improve after three months of conservative management.


Evaluation and Management of Concussion in Athletes: Recommendations from the AAN - Practice Guidelines


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