Items in AFP with MESH term: Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity

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AAP Guidelines on Treatment of Children with ADHD - Practice Guidelines


Atomoxetine for ADHD - STEPS


NIH Issues Consensus Statement on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder - Special Medical Reports


School Problems and the Family Physician - Article

ABSTRACT: Children with school problems pose a challenge for the family physician. A multidisciplinary team of professionals can most appropriately assess and manage complex learning problems, which are often the cause of poor school performance. The family physician's primary role in this process is to identify or exclude medical causes of learning difficulties. An understanding of the complicated nature of school problems, the methods used to assess, diagnose and treat them, and the resources available to support the child and family are essential to successful management. Various references and resources are helpful for a more in-depth study of specific school problems.


ADHD in Adults: A Commentary - Editorials


Integrating a Behavioral Health Specialist Into Your Practice - Feature


Diagnosis and Management of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adults - Article

ABSTRACT: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in childhood can persist into adulthood in at least 30 percent of patients, with 3 to 4 percent of adults meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., diagnostic criteria. A number of conditions, such as thyroid disease, mood disorders, and substance use disorders, have symptoms similar to those of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Steroids, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, caffeine, and nicotine also can have adverse effects that mimic attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. Proper diagnosis and treatment can improve daily functioning. Diagnosis relies on a thorough clinical history, supported by a number of rating scales that take five to 20 minutes to complete, depending on the scale. Clinical guidelines recommend stimulants and the nonstimulant atomoxetine as first-line treatments, followed by antidepressants. Cognitive behavior therapy has also been shown to be helpful as adjunctive treatment with medication. For adults with coexisting depression, the combination of an antidepressant and stimulants has been shown to be safe and effective. To monitor for misuse or diversion of stimulants, family physicians should consider using a controlled substances agreement and random urine drug screening in addition to regular follow-up visits.


Amphetamines for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adults - Cochrane for Clinicians


AAP Releases Guideline on Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of ADHD - Practice Guidelines


ADHD Interventions in Children Younger Than Six Years - Implementing AHRQ Effective Health Care Reviews


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