Items in AFP with MESH term: Calcitonin

Diagnosis and Treatment of Paget's Disease of Bone - Article

ABSTRACT: Paget's disease of bone (also known as osteitis deformans) is a nonmalignant disease involving accelerated bone resorption followed by deposition of dense, chaotic, and ineffectively mineralized bone matrix. The origin of the disease is unknown, and it is frequently asymptomatic; however, the patient may present with symptoms depending on the bones involved. The most common symptom is pain in the affected bone; neurologic, hearing, vision, cardiac, and oncologic complications are possible. Diagnosis is primarily made by radiographs. Bisphosphonates are the most common treatment.


Managing Menopause - Article

ABSTRACT: Many women will spend one third of their lifetime after menopause. A growing number of options are available for the treatment of menopausal symptoms like vasomotor instability and vaginal atrophy, as well as the long-term health risks such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis that are associated with menopause. Currently, hormone replacement therapy (estrogen with or without progestin) is the primary treatment for the symptoms and long-term risks associated with menopause. However, recent evidence calls into question the protective effect of estrogen on cardiovascular disease risk. The association of risk for breast cancer with estrogen replacement therapy also has not been fully clarified. In addition, many women cannot or choose not to take hormones. For treatment of osteoporosis and heart disease, pharmacologic choices include antiresorptive agents such as bisphosphonates and calcitonin, and estrogens or selective estrogen receptor modulators such as raloxifene. In addition, complementary options that include vitamins, herbal treatments, exercise and other lifestyle adaptations are gaining increased interest. The growing number of choices and questions in this area emphasizes the need to individualize a treatment plan for each woman to meet her specific needs.


Procalcitonin-Guided Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections - Point-of-Care Guides


Osteoporosis: Part II. Nonpharmacologic and Pharmacologic Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Family physicians will frequently encounter patients with osteoporosis, a condition that is often asymptomatic until a fracture occurs. Treatment of the fracture can be initiated without further diagnostic testing. Thereafter, treatment of osteoporosis includes (1) prevention of further bone loss through weight-bearing exercise, tobacco and alcohol avoidance, hormone replacement therapy in women, and raloxifene and calcium supplementation; (2) treatment of fracture-related pain with analgesics and calcitonin; (3) building bone mass when feasible with alendronate; and (4) modifying behaviors that increase the risk of falls. Patients without fracture who are at risk for osteoporosis can also benefit from these preventive measures. Furthermore, women of all ages should be encouraged to maintain a daily calcium intake of 1,000 to 1,500 mg and to participate in weight-bearing exercise for 30 minutes three times weekly to reduce their risk of falls and fractures. Persons at risk should avoid medications known to compromise bone density, such as glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones and chronic heparin therapy.



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