Items in AFP with MESH term: Uterine Cervical Neoplasms

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HPV Vaccine: A Cornerstone of Female Health - Editorials


ACS Releases Updated Guidelines on Cancer Screening - Practice Guidelines


Human Papillomavirus: Clinical Manifestations and Prevention - Article

ABSTRACT: Human papillomaviruses cause the most common sexually trans- mitted infection in the world and are responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Genital human papillomavirus infection can be divided into low-risk infections (causing genital warts) and high-risk infections (causing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and cervical and other cancers). Exposure to human papilloma- virus typically produces a sexually transmitted infection that may progress to a clinically apparent process, such as genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions of the lower genital tract. Although most human papillomavirus infections resolve spontane- ously within two years, some high-risk infections persist and are considered cancer precursors. Risk factors for persistent infection include multiple sex partners, sex at an early age, history of sexually transmitted infections, and smoking. Condom use is only partially protective against human papillomavirus infection. The two human papillomavirus vaccines are most effective if given to girls before the onset of sexual activity.


Bivalent HPV Recombinant Vaccine (Cervarix) for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer - STEPS


Purple Pubis Syndrome - Photo Quiz


Interventions to Increase Cervical Cancer Screening Rates - Cochrane for Clinicians


Screening for Cervical Cancer: Recommendation Statement - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


ACS/ASCCP/ASCP Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cervical Cancer - Editorials


Gynecologic Procedures: Colposcopy, Treatments of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia, and Endometrial Assessment - Article

ABSTRACT: Women who have abnormal Papanicolaou test results may undergo colposcopy to determine the biopsy site for histologic evaluation. Traditional grading systems do not accurately assess lesion severity because colposcopic impression alone is unreliable for diagnosis. The likelihood of finding cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher increases when two or more cervical biopsies are performed. Excisional and ablative methods have similar treatment outcomes for the eradication of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. However, diagnostic excisional methods, including loop electrosurgical excision procedure and cold knife conization, are associated with an increased risk of adverse obstetric outcomes, such as preterm labor and low birth weight. Methods of endometrial assessment have a high sensitivity for detecting endometrial carcinoma and benign causes of uterine bleeding without unnecessary procedures. Endometrial biopsy can reliably detect carcinoma involving a large portion of the endometrium, but is suboptimal for diagnosing focal lesions. A 3- to 4-mm cutoff for endometrial thickness on transvaginal ultrasonography yields the highest sensitivity to exclude endometrial carcinoma in postmenopausal women. Saline infusion sonohysteroscopy can differentiate globally thickened endometrium amenable to endometrial biopsy from focal abnormalities best assessed by hysteroscopy. Hysteroscopy with directed biopsy is the most sensitive and specific method of diagnosing endometrial carcinoma, other than hysterectomy.


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