Items in AFP with MESH term: Child Abuse

Child Abuse: Approach and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Child abuse is a common diagnosis in the United States and should be considered any time neglect or emotional, physical, or sexual abuse is a possibility. Although home visitation programs have been effective in preventing child maltreatment, much of the approach to and management of child abuse is directed by expert opinion or legal mandate. Any suspicion of abuse must be reported to Child Protective Services. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended to adequately evaluate and treat child abuse victims; however, the responsibility often lies with the family physician to recognize and treat these cases at first presentation to prevent significant morbidity and mortality.


It Sounds Like Child Abuse--But Is It? - Curbside Consultation


Primary Prevention of Child Abuse - Article

ABSTRACT: In 1993, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect declared a child protection emergency. Between 1985 and 1993, there was a 50 percent increase in reported cases of child abuse. Three million cases of child abuse are reported in the United States each year. Treatment of the abuser has had only limited success and child protection agencies are overwhelmed. Recently, efforts have begun to focus on the primary prevention of child abuse. Primary prevention of child abuse is defined as any intervention that prevents child abuse before it occurs. Primary prevention must be implemented on many levels before it can be successful. Strategies on the societal level include increasing the "value" of children, increasing the economic self-sufficiency of families, discouraging corporal punishment and other forms of violence, making health care more accessible and affordable, expanding and improving coordination of social services, improving the identification and treatment of psychologic problems, and alcohol and drug abuse, providing more affordable child care and preventing the birth of unwanted children. Strategies on the familial level include helping parents meet their basic needs, identifying problems of substance abuse and spouse abuse, and educating parents about child behavior, discipline, safety and development.


Evaluation of Physical Abuse in Children - Article

ABSTRACT: Family physicians who are involved in the care of children are likely to encounter child abuse and should be able to recognize its common presentations. A history that is inconsistent with the patient's injuries is the hallmark of physical abuse. A pattern of physical findings, including bruises and fractures in areas unlikely to be accidentally injured, patterned bruises from objects, and circumferential burns or bruises in children not yet mobile, should be viewed as suspicious for child abuse. Family physicians who suspect physical abuse are mandated to make a report to the state child protective services agency and to assure the ongoing safety of the child.


Child Abuse: The Physician's Role in Alleviating a Growing Problem - Editorials



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