Items in AFP with MESH term: Chlamydia Infections

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Screening for Chlamydial Infection: Recommendations and Rationale - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


Diagnosis and Treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection - Article

ABSTRACT: Chlamydia trachomatis infection most commonly affects the urogenital tract. In men, the infection usually is symptomatic, with dysuria and a discharge from the penis. Untreated chlamydial infection in men can spread to the epididymis. Most women with chlamydial infection have minimal or no symptoms, but some develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Chlamydial infection in newborns can cause ophthalmia neonatorum. Chlamydial pneumonia can occur at one to three months of age, manifesting as a protracted onset of staccato cough, usually without wheezing or fever. Treatment options for uncomplicated urogenital infections include a single 1-g dose of azithromycin orally, or doxycycline at a dosage of 100 mg orally twice per day for seven days. The recommended treatment during pregnancy is erythromycin base or amoxicillin. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for chlamydial infection in women at increased risk of infection and in all women younger than 25 years.


Screening for Chlamydial Infection - Putting Prevention into Practice


Epididymitis and Orchitis: An Overview - Article

ABSTRACT: Epididymitis and orchitis are commonly seen in the outpatient setting. Men between 14 and 35 years of age are most often affected, and Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most common pathogens in this age group. In other age groups, coliform bacteria are the primary pathogens. Men with epididymitis and orchitis typically present with a gradual onset of scrotal pain and symptoms of lower urinary tract infection, including fever. This presentation helps differentiate epididymitis and orchitis from testicular torsion, which is a surgical emergency. Typical physical findings include a swollen, tender epididymis or testis located in the normal anatomic position with an intact ipsilateral cremasteric reflex. Laboratory studies, including urethral Gram stain, urinalysis and culture, and polymerase chain reaction assay for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, help guide therapy. Initial outpatient therapy is empirical and targets the most common pathogens. When C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae are suspected, ceftriaxone and doxycycline are recommended. When coliform bacteria are suspected, ofloxacin or levofloxacin is recommended.


Screening for Chlamydial Infection - Putting Prevention into Practice


STDs in Patients with Multiple Partners: Confidentiality - Curbside Consultation


Diagnosis and Treatment of Urethritis in Men - Article

ABSTRACT: Symptoms of urethritis in men typically include urethral discharge, penile itching or tingling, and dysuria. A diagnosis can be made if at least one of the following is present: discharge, a positive result on a leukocyte esterase test in firstvoid urine, or at least 10 white blood cells per high-power field in urine sediment. The primary pathogens associated with urethritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Racial disparities in the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections persist in the United States, with rates of gonorrhea 40 times higher in black adolescent males than in white adolescent males. Recent studies have focused on identifying causes of nongonococcal urethritis and developing testing for atypical organisms, such as Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma species. Less common pathogens identified in patients with urethritis include Trichomonas species, adenovirus, and herpes simplex virus. History and examination findings can help distinguish urethritis from other urogenital syndromes, such as epididymitis, orchitis, and prostatitis. The goals of treatment include alleviating symptoms; preventing complications in the patient and his sexual partners; reducing the transmission of coinfections (particularly human immunodeficiency virus); identifying and treating the patient’s contacts; and encouraging behavioral changes that will reduce the risk of recurrence. The combination of azithromycin or doxycycline plus ceftriaxone or cefixime is considered first-line empiric therapy in patients with urethritis. Expedited partner treatment, which involves giving patients prescriptions for partners who have not been examined by the physician, is advocated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has been approved in many states. There is an association between urethritis and an increased human immunodeficiency virus concentration in semen.


A Troubled Teen: Matters of Confidentiality - Curbside Consultation


Drug Treatment of Common STDs: Part I. Herpes, Syphilis, Urethritis, Chlamydia and Gonorrhea - Article

ABSTRACT: In 1998, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Several treatment advances have been made since the previous guidelines were published. Part I of this two-part article describes current recommendations for the treatment of genital ulcer diseases, urethritis and cervicitis. Treatment advances include effective single-dose regimens for many sexually transmitted diseases and improved therapies for herpes infections. Two single-dose regimens, 1 g of oral azithromycin and 250 mg of intramuscular ceftriaxone, are effective for the treatment of chancroid. A three-day course of 500 mg of oral ciprofloxacin twice daily may be used to treat chancroid in patients who are not pregnant. Parenteral penicillin continues to be the drug of choice for treatment of all stages of syphilis. Three antiviral medications have been shown to provide clinical benefit in the treatment of genital herpes: acyclovir, valacyclovir and famciclovir. Valacyclovir and famciclovir are not yet recommended for use during pregnancy. Azithromycin in a single oral 1-g dose is now a recommended regimen for the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis.


Thinking About Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Editorials


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