Items in AFP with MESH term: Clinical Protocols

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Glucose Control in Hospitalized Patients - Article

ABSTRACT: Evidence indicates that hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia do not benefit from tight blood glucose control. Maintaining a blood glucose level of less than 180 mg per dL (9.99 mmol per L) will minimize symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia without adversely affecting patient-oriented health outcomes. In the absence of modifying factors, physicians should continue patients’ at-home diabetes mellitus medications and randomly check glucose levels once daily. Sulfonylureas should be withheld to avoid hypoglycemia in patients with limited caloric intake. Patients with cardiovascular conditions may benefit from temporarily stopping treatment with thiazolidinediones to avoid precipitating heart failure. Metformin should be temporarily withheld in patients who have worsening renal function or who will undergo an imaging study that uses contrast. When patients need to be treated with insulin in the short term, using a long-acting basal insulin combined with a short-acting insulin before meals (with the goal of keeping blood glucose less than 180 mg per dL) better approximates normal physiology and uses fewer nursing resources than sliding-scale insulin approaches. Most studies have found that infusion with glucose, insulin, and potassium does not improve mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction should have moderate control of blood glucose using home regimens or basal insulin with correctional doses.


Glycemic Control in the Hospital: What to Do When Experts Disagree - Editorials


Transcervical Amnioinfusion - Article

ABSTRACT: Amnioinfusion is being used to treat intrapartum problems known to be associated with fetal compromise, including prophylactic treatment of oligohydramnios during labor and after premature rupture of the membranes, treatment of severe variable decelerations during labor and reducing the risk of meconium aspiration during labor in patients with thick meconium fluid. The procedure is considered effective and easy to perform, with the benefits outweighing the risks.


Current Trends in Cervical Ripening and Labor Induction - Editorials


Evaluation of Chest Pain in Primary Care Patients - Point-of-Care Guides


Rethinking Your Approach to Prescription "Refills" - Feature


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