Items in AFP with MESH term: Contraceptives, Postcoital

Emergency Contraception - Article

ABSTRACT: Women can use emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy after known or suspected failure of birth control or after unprotected intercourse. Many patients do not ask for emergency contraception because they do not know of its availability. Emergency contraception has been an off-label use of oral contraceptive pills since the 1960s. Dedicated products, the Yuzpe regimen (Preven) and levonorgestrel (Plan B), were marketed in the United States after 1998 but had been available in Europe for years before that. A third approved method of emergency contraception is the insertion of an intrauterine device. Emergency contraception is about 75 to 85 percent effective. It is most effective when initiated within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse. The mechanism of action may vary, depending on the day of the menstrual cycle on which treatment is started. Despite the large number of women who have received emergency contraception, there have been no reports of major adverse outcomes. If a woman becomes pregnant after using emergency contraception, she may be reassured about the lack of negative effects emergency contraception has on fetal development. It may be beneficial for physicians to offer an advance prescription for emergency contraception at a patient's regular gynecologic visit to help reduce unwanted pregnancies. Advance provision of emergency contraception can increase its use significantly without adversely affecting the use of routine contraception.


Update on Oral Contraceptive Pills - Article

ABSTRACT: Oral contraceptive pills are widely used and are generally safe and effective for many women. The World Health Organization has developed a risk classification system to help physicians advise patients about the safety of oral contraceptive pills. The choice of pill formulation is influenced by clinical considerations. By choosing appropriately from the available pill formulations, family physicians can minimize negative side effects and maximize noncontraceptive benefits for their patients. Additional monitoring and follow-up are necessary in special populations, such as women over 35 years of age, smokers, perimenopausal women and adolescents. Third-generation progestins are additional options for achieving noncontraceptive benefits, but their use has raised new questions about thrombogenesis. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has labeled emergency postcoital contraception for use following unprotected coitus. Oral contraceptive pills are associated with few clinically significant drug interactions, although consideration of interactions remains important.


Emergency Contraception: An Ongoing Debate - Editorials


Advance Provision for Emergency Oral Contraception - Cochrane for Clinicians


ACOG Recommendations on Emergency Contraception - Practice Guidelines


Emergency Contraception: Still Not Too Late - Editorials


Informed Consent and Emergency Contraception - Editorials


An Update on Emergency Contraception - Article

ABSTRACT: Emergency contraception decreases the risk of unintended pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse or after suspected failure of routine contraception (e.g., a condom breaking). Oral methods include combined contraceptive pills (i.e., Yuzpe method), single- or split-dose levonorgestrel, and ulipristal. The Yuzpe method and levonorgestrel are U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved for use 72 hours postcoitus, whereas the newest method, ulipristal, is approved for up to 120 hours postcoitus. The copper intrauterine device may be used as emergency contraception up to seven days after unprotected intercourse. It is nonhormonal and has the added benefit of long-term contraception. Advanced provision of emergency contraception may be useful for all patients, and for persons using ulipristal because it is available only by prescription. Physicians should counsel patients on the use and effectiveness of emergency contraception, the methods available, and the benefits of routine and consistent contraception use.



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