Items in AFP with MESH term: Coronary Disease

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Should We Use Multiple Risk Factor Interventions for the Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Promoting Physical Activity in the Family Practice Setting - Editorials


Hormone Therapy: Continuing Discussion and Debate - Editorials


Screening for Coronary Heart Disease: Recommendation Statement - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


The Vitamin E Saga: Lessons in Patient-Oriented Evidence - Editorials


Does a Low Glycemix Index Diet Reduce CHD? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Effective Use of Statins to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Primary and secondary prevention trials have shown that use of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (also known as statins) to lower an elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level can substantially reduce coronary events and death from coronary heart disease. In 1987 and 1993, the National Cholesterol Education Program promulgated guidelines for cholesterol screening and treatment. Thus far, however, primary care physicians have inadequately adopted these guidelines in clinical practice. A 1991 study found that cholesterol screening was performed in only 23 percent of patients. Consequently, many patients with elevated low-density lipoprotein levels and a high risk of primary or recurrent ischemic events remain unidentified and untreated. A study published in 1998 found that fewer than 15 percent of patients with known coronary heart disease have low-density lipoprotein levels at the recommended level of below 100 mg per dL (2.60 mmol per L). By identifying patients with elevated low-density lipoprotein levels and instituting appropriate lipid-lowering therapy, family physicians could help prevent cardiovascular events and death in many of their patients.


Coronary Artery Disease Prevention: What's Different for Women? - Article

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women, as well as an important cause of disability, although many women and their physicians underestimate the risk. Exercise, hypertension treatment, smoking cessation and aspirin therapy are effective measures for the primary prevention of coronary artery disease in women. The roles of lipid-lowering agents and hormone replacement therapy in primary prevention are not well established. In secondary prevention, hormone replacement therapy has not been effective in lowering the risk of recurrent myocardial infarction, but several lipid-lowering agents have been shown to reduce this risk and to lower mortality rates in women with known coronary artery disease. Other secondary prevention measures, including aspirin, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, revascularization and rehabilitation, have proven benefits in women but are underused, especially in minority women. Family physicians should emphasize the use of proven treatments, with particular attention given to underserved populations.


Cholesterol Treatment Guidelines Update - Article

ABSTRACT: Hypercholesterolemia is one of the major contributors to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease in our society. The National Cholesterol Education Program of the National Institutes of Health has created a set of guidelines that standardize the clinical assessment and management of hypercholesterolemia for practicing physicians and other professionals in the medical community. In May 2001, the National Cholesterol Education Program released its third set of guidelines, reflecting changes in cholesterol management since their previous report in 1993. In addition to modifying current strategies of risk assessment, the new guidelines stress the importance of an aggressive therapeutic approach in the management of hypercholesterolemia. The major risk factors that modify low-density lipoprotein goals include age, smoking status, hypertension, high-density lipoprotein levels, and family history. The concept of "CHD equivalent" is introduced-conditions requiring the same vigilance used in patients with coronary heart disease. Patients with diabetes and those with a 10-year cardiac event risk of 20 percent or greater are considered CHD equivalents. Once low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is at an accepted level, physicians are advised to address the metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemia.


Preoperative Cardiac Risk Assessment - Article

ABSTRACT: Heart disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. An important subset of heart disease is perioperative myocardial infarction, which affects approximately 50,000 persons each year. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) have coauthored a guideline on preoperative cardiac risk assessment, as has the American College of Physicians (ACP). The ACC/AHA guideline uses major, intermediate, and minor clinical predictors to stratify patients into different cardiac risk categories. Patients with poor functional status or those undergoing high-risk surgery require further risk stratification via cardiac stress testing. The ACP guideline also starts by screening patients for clinical variables that predict perioperative cardiac complications. However, the ACP did not feel there was enough evidence to support poor functional status as a significant predictor of increased risk. High-risk patients would sometimes merit preoperative cardiac catheterization by the ACC/AHA guideline, while the ACP version would reserve catheterization only for those who were candidates for cardiac revascularization independent of their noncardiac surgery. A recent development in prophylaxis of surgery-related cardiac complications is the use of beta blockers perioperatively for patients with cardiac risk factors.


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