Items in AFP with MESH term: Depression

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Adolescent Substance Use and Abuse: Recognition and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Substance abuse in adolescents is undertreated in the United States. Family physicians are well positioned to recognize substance use in their patients and to take steps to address the issue before use escalates. Comorbid mental disorders among adolescents with substance abuse include depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder. Office-, home-, and school-based drug testing is not routinely recommended. Screening tools for adolescent substance abuse include the CRAFFT questionnaire. Family therapy is crucial in the management of adolescent substance use disorders. Although family physicians may be able to treat adolescents with substance use disorders in the office setting, it is often necessary and prudent to refer patients to one or more appropriate consultants who specialize specifically in substance use disorders, psychology, or psychiatry. Treatment options include anticipatory guidance, brief therapeutic counseling, school-based drug-counseling programs, outpatient substance abuse clinics, day treatment programs, and inpatient and residential programs. Working within community and family contexts, family physicians can activate and oversee the system of professionals and treatment components necessary for optimal management of substance misuse in adolescents.


Identifying and Managing Preparatory Grief and Depression at the End of Life - Article

ABSTRACT: Grief and depression present similarly in patients who are dying. Conventional symptoms (e.g., frequent crying, weight loss, thoughts of death) used to assess for depression in these patients may be imprecise because these symptoms are also present in preparatory grief and as a part of the normal dying process. Preparatory grief is experienced by virtually all patients who are dying and can be facilitated with psychosocial support and counseling. Ongoing pharmacotherapy is generally not beneficial and may even be harmful to patients who are grieving. Evidence of disturbed self-esteem, hopelessness, an active desire to die and ruminative thoughts about death and suicide are indicative of depression in patients who are dying. Physicians should have a low threshold for treating depression in patients nearing the end of life because depression is associated with tremendous suffering and poor quality of life.


Screening Instruments for Depression - Point-of-Care Guides


Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly - Editorials


Routine Screening for Depression, Alcohol Problems, and Domestic Violence - Point-of-Care Guides


Antidepressant Medications in Pregnancy - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


St. John's Wort for Depression - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Counseling or Antidepressants for Treating Depression? - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Making Psychotherapy Work in Primary Care Medicine - Editorials


Screening for Depression - Cochrane for Clinicians


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