Items in AFP with MESH term: Diabetes Mellitus

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PRE-OPportunity Knocks: A Different Way to Think About the Preoperative Evaluation - Editorials


Using Flow Sheets to Improve Diabetes Care - Improving Patient Care


Making Diabetes Checkups More Fruitful - Improving Patient Care


A Team Approach to Quality Improvement - Feature


Improving Chronic Disease Care in the Real World: A Step-by-Step Approach - Feature


How Inclusive Leadership Can Help Your Practice Adapt to Change - Feature


ADA Releases Revisions to Recommendations for Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes - Practice Guidelines


Transient Ischemic Attack: Part II. Risk Factor Modification and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Interventions following a transient ischemic attack are aimed at preventing a future episode or stroke. Hypertension, current smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia are all well-known risk factors, and controlling these factors can have dramatic effects on transient ischemic attack and stroke risk. For patients presenting within 48 hours of resolution of transient ischemic attack symptoms, advantages of hospital admission include rapid diagnostic evaluation and early intervention to reduce the risk of stroke. For long-term prevention of future stroke, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends antiplatelet agents, statins, and carotid artery intervention for advanced stenosis. Aspirin, extended-release dipyridamole/aspirin, and clopidogrel are acceptable first-line antiplatelet agents. Statins have also been shown to reduce the risk of stroke following transient ischemic attack, with maximal benefit occurring with at least a 50 percent reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level or a target of less than 70 mg per dL (1.81 mmol per L). For those with transient ischemic attack and carotid artery stenosis, carotid endarterectomy is recommended if stenosis is 70 to 99 percent, and perioperative morbidity and mortality are estimated to be less than 6 percent.


Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions - Putting Prevention into Practice


Metformin Use in Adolescents - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


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