Items in AFP with MESH term: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

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Glycemic Control in Hospitalized Patients Not in Intensive Care: Beyond Sliding-Scale Insulin - Article

ABSTRACT: Glycemic control in hospitalized patients who are not in intensive care remains unsatisfactory. Despite persistent expert recommendations urging its abandonment, the use of sliding-scale insulin remains pervasive in U.S. hospitals. Evidence for the effectiveness of sliding-scale insulin is lacking after more than 40 years of use. New physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols use basal, nutritional, and correctional insulin. The initial total daily dose of subcutaneous insulin is calculated using a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 units per kg body weight, with one half given as long-acting insulin (the basal insulin dose), and the other one half divided daily over three meals as short-acting insulin doses (nutritional insulin doses). A correctional insulin dose provides a final insulin adjustment based on the preprandial glucose value. This correctional dose resembles a sliding scale, but is only a small fine-tuning of therapy, as opposed to traditional sliding-scale insulin alone. Insulin sensitivity, nutritional intake, and total daily dosing review can alter the physiologic insulin-dosing schedule. Prospective trials have demonstrated reductions in hyperglycemic measurements, hypoglycemia, and adjusted hospital length of stay when physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols are used. Transitions in care require special considerations and attention to glycemic control medications. Changing the sliding-scale insulin culture requires a multidisciplinary effort to improve patient safety and outcomes.


Screening for Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults - Putting Prevention into Practice


Low Glycemic Index Diets for the Management of Diabetes - Cochrane for Clinicians


Diabetes Mellitus: Diagnosis and Screening - Article

ABSTRACT: Based on etiology, diabetes is classified as type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, latent autoimmune diabetes, maturity-onset diabetes of youth, and miscellaneous causes. The diagnosis is based on measurement of A1C level, fasting or random blood glucose level, or oral glucose tolerance testing. Although there are conflicting guidelines, most agree that patients with hypertension or hyperlipidemia should be screened for diabetes. Diabetes risk calculators have a high negative predictive value and help define patients who are unlikely to have diabetes. Tests that may help establish the type of diabetes or the continued need for insulin include those reflective of beta cell function, such as C peptide levels, and markers of immune-mediated beta cell destruction (e.g., autoantibodies to islet cells, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine phosphatase [IA-2a and IA-2ß]). Antibody testing is limited by availability, cost, and predictive value.


Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults - Editorials


Glycemic Control in the Hospital: What to Do When Experts Disagree - Editorials


Diplopia and Ptosis - Photo Quiz


Does Metformin Increase the Risk of Fatal or Nonfatal Lactic Acidosis? - Cochrane for Clinicians


A Lifestyle That Enables Me to Control My Type 2 Diabetes - Close-ups


Why Can't This Patient Take Insulin? - Curbside Consultation


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