Items in AFP with MESH term: Emergencies

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Dermatologic Emergencies - Article

ABSTRACT: Life-threatening dermatologic conditions include Rocky Mountain spotted fever; necrotizing fasciitis; toxic epidermal necrolysis; and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most common rickettsial disease in the United States, with an overall mortality rate of 5 to 10 percent. Classic symptoms include fever, headache, and rash in a patient with a history of tick bite or exposure. Doxycycline is the first-line treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infection of the deep fascia, with necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues. It usually occurs after surgery or trauma. Patients have erythema and pain out of proportion to the physical findings. Immediate surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy should be initiated. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute hypersensitivity cutaneous reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is characterized by target lesions with central dusky purpura or a central bulla. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a more severe reaction with full-thickness epidermal necrosis and exfoliation. Most cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are drug induced. The causative drug should be discontinued immediately, and the patient should be hospitalized for supportive care.


Common Peripartum Emergencies - Article

ABSTRACT: Peripartum emergencies occur in patients with no known risk factors. When the well-being of the fetus is in question, the fetal heart rate pattern may offer etiologic clues. Repetitive late decelerations may signify uteroplacental insufficiency, and a sinusoidal pattern may indicate severe fetal distress. Repetitive variable decelerations suggesting umbilical cord compression may be relieved by amnioinfusion. Regardless of the etiology of the nonreassuring fetal heart pattern, measures to improve fetal oxygenation should be attempted while options for delivery are considered. Massive obstetric hemorrhage requires prompt action. Clinical signs, such as painless bleeding, uterine tenderness and nonreassuring fetal heart patterns, may help to differentiate causes of vaginal bleeding that may or may not require emergency cesarean delivery. The causes of postpartum hemorrhage include uterine atony, vaginal or cervical laceration, and retained placenta. The challenge of managing shoulder dystocia is to effect a rapid delivery while avoiding neonatal and maternal morbidity. The McRoberts maneuver has been shown to be the safest and most successful technique for relieving shoulder dystocia. Eclampsia responds best to magnesium sulfate, supportive care and supplemental hydralazine or labetalol as needed for severe hypertension.


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