Items in AFP with MESH term: Endocarditis, Bacterial

Caring for Infants with Congenital Heart Disease and Their Families - Article

ABSTRACT: Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta. Congestive heart failure is the primary concern in infants with acyanotic lesions. The most common cyanotic lesions are tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. In infants with cyanotic lesions, hypoxia is more of a problem than congestive heart failure. Suspicion of a congenital heart defect should be raised by the presence of feeding difficulties in association with tachypnea, sweating and subcostal recession, or severe growth impairment. Follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease should follow the schedule of routine care for healthy babies with some modifications, such as administration of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. More frequent follow-up is required if congestive heart failure is present. Family psychosocial issues should also be addressed. One of the main roles for the family physician is to help the parents put the diagnosis in perspective by clarifying expectations and misconceptions, and answering specific questions.


Preventing Bacterial Endocarditis: American Heart Association Guidelines - Article

ABSTRACT: The American Heart Association recently revised its guidelines for the prevention of bacterial endocarditis. These guidelines are meant to aid physicians, dentists and other health care providers, but they are not intended to define the standard of care or to serve as a substitute for clinical judgment. In the guidelines, cardiac conditions are stratified into high-, moderate- and negligible-risk categories based on the potential outcome if endocarditis develops. Procedures that may cause bacteremia and for which prophylaxis is recommended are clearly specified. In addition, an algorithm has been developed to more clearly define when prophylaxis is recommended in patients with mitral valve prolapse. For oral and dental procedures, the standard prophylactic regimen is a single dose of oral amoxicillin (2 g in adults and 50 mg per kg in children), but a follow-up dose is no longer recommended. Clindamycin and other alternatives are recommended for use in patients who are allergic to penicillin. For gastrointestinal and genitourinary procedures, the prophylactic regimens have been simplified. The new recommendations are meant to more clearly define when prophylaxis is or is not recommended, to improve compliance, to reduce cost and the incidence of gastrointestinal side effects, and to approach more uniform worldwide recommendations.


Management of Bacterial Endocarditis - Article

ABSTRACT: Most cases of bacterial endocarditis involve infection with viridans streptococci, enterococci, coagulase-positive staphylococci or coagulase-negative staphylococci. The choice of antibiotic therapy for bacterial endocarditis is determined by the identity and antibiotic susceptibility of the infecting organism, the type of cardiac valve involved (native or prosthetic) and characteristics of the patient, such as drug allergies. Antibiotic therapies discussed in this report are based on recommendations of the American Heart Association. Treatment with aqueous penicillin or ceftriaxone is effective for most infections caused by streptococci. A combination of penicillin or ampicillin with gentamicin is appropriate for endocarditis caused by enterococci that are not highly resistant to penicillin. Vancomycin should be substituted for penicillin when high-level resistance is present. Resistance of enterococci to multiple antibiotics including vancomycin is becoming an increasing problem. Native valve infection by methicillin-susceptible staphylococci is treated with nafcillin, oxacillin or cefazolin. The addition of gentamicin for the first three to five days may accelerate clearing of bacteremia. Infection of a prosthetic valve by a staphylococcal organism should be treated with three antibiotics: oral rifampin and gentamicin and either nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin or vancomycin, depending on susceptibility to methicillin. Vancomycin is substituted for penicillin in patients with a history of immediate-type hypersensitivity to penicillin.


Endocarditis Prophylaxis: An Evolution of Change - Editorials


ACOG Releases Guidelines for Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in Labor and Delivery - Practice Guidelines


Prophylaxis for Invasive Dental Procedures in At-Risk Patients - Cochrane for Clinicians


Valve Disease and Diet Pills-Where Do We Stand? - Editorials


Infectious Endocarditis: Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Infectious endocarditis results from bacterial or fungal infection of the endocardial surface of the heart and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Risk factors include the presence of a prosthetic heart valve, structural or congenital heart disease, intravenous drug use, and a recent history of invasive procedures. Endocarditis should be suspected in patients with unexplained fevers, night sweats, or signs of systemic illness. Diagnosis is made using the Duke criteria, which include clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic findings. Antibiotic treatment of infectious endocarditis depends on whether the involved valve is native or prosthetic, as well as the causative microorganism and its antibiotic susceptibilities. Common blood culture isolates include Staphylococcus aureus, viridans Streptococcus, enterococci, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Valvular structural and functional integrity may be adversely affected in infectious endocarditis, and surgical consultation is warranted in patients with aggressive or persistent infections, emboli, and valvular compromise or rupture. After completion of antibiotic therapy, patients should be educated about the importance of daily dental hygiene, regular visits to the dentist, and the need for antibiotic prophylaxis before certain procedures.



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