Items in AFP with MESH term: Growth Disorders

Evaluation of Short and Tall Stature in Children - Article

ABSTRACT: Children and adolescents whose heights and growth velocities deviate from the normal percentiles on standard growth charts present a special challenge to physicians. Height that is less than the 3rd percentile or greater than the 97th percentile is deemed short or tall stature, respectively. A growth velocity outside the 25th to 75th percentile range may be considered abnormal. Serial height measurements over time documented on a growth chart are key in identifying abnormal growth. Short or tall stature is usually caused by variants of a normal growth pattern, although some patients may have serious underlying pathologies. A comprehensive history and physical examination can help differentiate abnormal growth patterns from normal variants and identify specific dysmorphic features of genetic syndromes. History and physical examination findings should guide laboratory testing.


Care of the Premature Infant: Part I. Monitoring Growth and Development - Article

ABSTRACT: When monitoring growth and development in the premature infant, physicians should make adjustments for the estimated due date. With minor exceptions, administration of immunizations is based on the chronologic age. Administration of hepatitis B vaccine should be delayed until the infant weighs 2,000 g (4 lb, 5 oz). Administration of influenza vaccine should be considered in infants with chronic medical problems, and the pneumococcal vaccine may be beneficial at age two in children with chronic problems, especially pulmonary disease. Premature infants should also be monitored to assure appropriate nutrition. Breast-fed infants should probably receive vitamin supplements during the first year. Supplemental iron should be initiated at two weeks to two months after birth and continued for 12 to 15 months. Office care includes screening for problems that occur more frequently in premature infants, especially vision and hearing problems. Because many of these infants require care from multiple medical disciplines, coordination of care is another important role for the family physician. The goals of this care are to promote normal growth and development and minimize morbidity and mortality.


Office Care of the Premature Infant: Part II. Common Medical and Surgical Problems - Article

ABSTRACT: Medical problems associated with prematurity are frequently complex, and a multidisciplinary approach is often required. Some common problems include the following: (1) anemia, which can be reduced by iron supplementation, (2) cerebral palsy or mental retardation as a result of intraventricular hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia, (3) respiratory problems, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia and apnea, (4) visual problems, such as those associated with retinopathy of prematurity, (5) gastroesophageal reflux and (6) surgical problems, including inguinal or umbilical hernia and cryptorchidism. Monitoring of growth and development includes recording the infant's head circumference, weight and length on a growth chart for premature infants. Nutritional status should be assessed at each visit, watching for hyperosmolar problems in infants receiving high-calorie formulas. Consultation with other specialists may be required if abnormalities are identified during follow-up care in the office.


Assessment of Abnormal Growth Curves - Article

ABSTRACT: An important part of well-child care is the assessment of a child's growth. While growth in the vast majority of children falls within normal percentile ranges on standard growth curves, an occasional child demonstrates worrisome deviations in weight, height or head size. A single growth percentile value at any particular point in a child's life is only of limited usefulness to the physician. More important is the child's rate of growth. Children whose growth parameters are at the extremes of the growth curve but whose growth rates are normal are likely to be healthy. Conversely, accelerated or slowed growth rates are rarely normal and warrant further evaluation. This article addresses the initial steps to be taken when evaluating children with suspected growth abnormalities, the guiding principles that apply to all growth problems, and the most common growth curve deviations and approaches to their management.



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