Items in AFP with MESH term: Health Promotion

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Geriatric Screening and Preventive Care - Article

ABSTRACT: Preventive health care decisions and recommendations become more complex as the population ages. The leading causes of death (i.e., heart disease, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory disease) among older adults mirror the actual causes of death (i.e., tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) among persons of all ages. Many aspects of mortality in older adults are modifiable through behavior change. Patients 65 years and older should be counseled on smoking cessation, diets rich in healthy fats, aerobic exercise, and strength training. Other types of preventive care include aspirin therapy; lipid management; and administration of tetanus and diphtheria, pneumococcal, and influenza vaccines. Although cancer is the second leading cause of death in patients 65 years and older, a survival benefit from cancer screening is not seen unless the patient's life expectancy exceeds five years. Therefore, it is best to review life expectancy, functionality, and comorbidities with older patients when making cancer screening recommendations. Other recommended screenings include abdominal aortic aneurysm for men 65 to 75 years of age, breast cancer for women 40 years and older with a life expectancy greater than five years, and colorectal cancer for men and women 50 years and older with a life expectancy greater than five years.


Updated Dietary Guidelines from the USDA and HHS - Practice Guidelines


Improved Breastfeeding Success Through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative - Editorials


Why Can't I Get My Patients to Exclusively Breastfeed Their Babies? - Curbside Consultation


Changing Patient Health-Risk Behavior Requires New Investment in Primary Care - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

ABSTRACT: Evidence supports the effectiveness of primary care interventions to improve nutrition, increase physical activity levels, reduce alcohol intake, and stop tobacco use. However, implementing these interventions requires considerable practice expense. If we hope to change behavior to reduce chronic illness, the way we pay for primary care services must be modified to incorporate these expenses.


Making Wellness Medicine Work - Feature


Eight Ideas for Managing Stress and Extinguishing Burnout - Feature


How to Make the Media Your Public Health Partner - Feature


Reinventing Family Medicine - Editorial


Decreasing Self-Perceived Health Status Despite Rising Health Expenditures - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

ABSTRACT: Despite steady increases in U.S. health care spending, the population's self-perceived health status has been in a long-term decline. Increased support for public health, prevention, and primary care could reduce growth in spending and improve actual and perceived health.


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