Items in AFP with MESH term: Hemorrhage

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Common Anorectal Conditions: Part I. Symptoms and Complaints - Article

ABSTRACT: Anorectal symptoms and complaints are common and may be caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Although most conditions are benign and may be successfully treated by primary care practitioners, a high index of suspicion for colorectal cancer should be maintained, and all patients should be appropriately investigated. Inspection, palpation and anoscopic examination using an Ive's slotted anoscope provide adequate initial assessment. Pruritus ani usually represents a self-perpetuating itch-scratch cycle and is uncommonly due to infection. The history, as well as the physical examination, can distinguish anal pain due to hemorrhoids, fissure, abscess, cancer or proctalgia fugax. The most frequent causes of rectal bleeding are hemorrhoids, fissures and polyps. Diagnoses associated with difficulty in passing stool can range from constipation to fecal incontinence.


Bleeding and Bruising: A Diagnostic Work-up - Article

ABSTRACT: Primary care physicians are often asked about easy bruising, excessive bleeding, or risk of bleeding before surgery. A thorough history, including a family history, will guide the appropriate work-up, and a physical examination may provide clues to diagnosis. A standardized bleeding score system can help physicians to organize the patient's bleeding history and to avoid overlooking the most common inherited bleeding disorder, von Willebrand's disease. In cases of suspected bleeding disorders, initial laboratory evaluations should include a complete blood count with platelet count, peripheral blood smear, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. More specialized yet relatively simple tests, such as the Platelet Function Analyzer-100, mixing studies, and inhibitor assays, may also be helpful. These tests can help diagnose platelet function disorders, quantitative platelet disorders, factor deficiencies, and factor inhibitors.


Indications for Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation - Article

ABSTRACT: Factors associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) include increasing age, rheumatic heart disease, poor left ventricular function, previous myocardial infarction, hypertension and a past history of a thromboembolic event. Patients with AF should be considered for anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy based on the patient's age, the presence of other risk factors for stroke and the risk of complications from anticoagulation. In general, patients with risk factors for stroke should receive warfarin anticoagulation, regardless of their age. In patients who are under age 65 and have no other risk factors for stroke, either aspirin therapy or no therapy at all is recommended. Aspirin or warfarin is recommended for use in patients between 65 and 75 years of age with no other risk factors, and warfarin is recommended for use in patients without risk factors who are older than 75 years of age.


Warfarin Therapy: Evolving Strategies in Anticoagulation - Article

ABSTRACT: Warfarin is the oral anticoagulant most frequently used to control and prevent thromboembolic disorders. Prescribing the dose that both avoids hemorrhagic complications and achieves sufficient suppression of thrombosis requires a thorough understanding of the drug's unique pharmacology. Warfarin has a complex dose-response relationship that makes safe and effective use a challenge. For most indications, the dose is adjusted to maintain the patient's International Normalized Ratio (INR) at 2 to 3. Because of the delay in factor II (prothrombin) suppression, heparin is administered concurrently for four to five days to prevent thrombus propagation. Loading doses of warfarin are not warranted and may result in bleeding complications. Interactions with other drugs must be considered, and therapy in elderly patients requires careful management. Current dosing recommendations are reviewed, and practical guidelines for the optimal use of warfarin are provided.


Hemorrhagic Pustules, Tenosynovitis, and Arthritis - Photo Quiz


Umbilical Cord Clamping in Preterm Infants - Cochrane for Clinicians


Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain - Cochrane for Clinicians


Predicting the Risk of Bleeding in Patients Taking Warfarin - Point-of-Care Guides


Asymptomatic Linear Hemorrhages - Photo Quiz


Diagnosing Von Willebrand Disease - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


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