Items in AFP with MESH term: Hypercholesterolemia

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Dietary Therapy for Children with Hypercholesterolemia - Article

ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence clearly shows that atherosclerosis begins in youth. The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) has recommended that children at high risk of developing coronary artery disease as adults be screened so that those with elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels can be treated, primarily by modification of diet. The initial approach to these youthful patients is to use the NCEP step I diet. This diet provides calories and nutrients that support normal growth and development, but limits saturated fat and total fat intake to no more than 10 and 30 percent of total calories, respectively, and cholesterol intake to no more than 100 mg per 1,000 kcal per day, to a maximum of 300 mg. If the goal of reducing the LDL cholesterol level to below 130 mg per dL (3.35 mmol per L) is not achieved, the more restrictive step II diet should be initiated. However, the step II diet may not provide sufficient calories and nutrients to support normal growth and development; therefore, trained nutritionists may be required to effectively manage a child on this diet.


Hypercholesterolemia in Children - Editorials


AHA and ACC Outline Approaches to Coronary Disease Risk Assessment - Practice Guidelines


Alternative Therapies: Part II. Congestive Heart Failure and Hypercholesterolemia - Article

ABSTRACT: Natural supplements are widely used by the American public but, while claims of their therapeutic effects abound, medical research does not always support their effectiveness. Clinical trials using Q10 for the management of congestive heart failure have had conflicting results; hawthorn is prescribed in Germany for the treatment of this condition, but no trials have been conducted in the United States. Although initial research about the use of garlic in the management of hypercholesterolemia was encouraging, follow-up studies have failed to verify these results. Substituting soy protein for high-fat animal protein diets, however, does have a beneficial effect on serum lipid levels. So far, cholestin (a natural product containing several statins) has proved to be a cost-saving lipid-lowering medication, and fenugreek may offer modest improvement as well. Gugulipid is also promising but requires further research.


Understanding the Risks of Medical Interventions - Improving Patient Care


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