Items in AFP with MESH term: Immunization Schedule

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Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule, United States, July to December, 2004 - Practice Guidelines


The 2006 Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule: Reflections at the 50th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine - Editorials


Vaccines for Preventing Influenza in Healthy Children - Cochrane for Clinicians


AAFP Childhood Immunization Update - Special Medical Reports


AAFP, AAP and ACIP Release 1998 Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule - Special Medical Reports


Care of the Premature Infant: Part I. Monitoring Growth and Development - Article

ABSTRACT: When monitoring growth and development in the premature infant, physicians should make adjustments for the estimated due date. With minor exceptions, administration of immunizations is based on the chronologic age. Administration of hepatitis B vaccine should be delayed until the infant weighs 2,000 g (4 lb, 5 oz). Administration of influenza vaccine should be considered in infants with chronic medical problems, and the pneumococcal vaccine may be beneficial at age two in children with chronic problems, especially pulmonary disease. Premature infants should also be monitored to assure appropriate nutrition. Breast-fed infants should probably receive vitamin supplements during the first year. Supplemental iron should be initiated at two weeks to two months after birth and continued for 12 to 15 months. Office care includes screening for problems that occur more frequently in premature infants, especially vision and hearing problems. Because many of these infants require care from multiple medical disciplines, coordination of care is another important role for the family physician. The goals of this care are to promote normal growth and development and minimize morbidity and mortality.


Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Issues Recommendations for the 1998-99 Influenza Season - Special Medical Reports


ACIP Issues Recommendations to Eliminate Measles, Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome and to Control Mumps - Special Medical Reports


The 1999 Harmonized Immunization Schedule - Special Medical Reports


Poliovirus Vaccine Options - Article

ABSTRACT: As a result of the success of immunization, indigenous wild poliomyelitis has disappeared from the United States. Of 142 confirmed cases of paralytic poliomyelitis reported in the United States from 1980 to 1996, 134 were classified as vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). Persons with VAPP have a disabling illness, and this has caught the attention of the lay media. The risk of VAPP is one case per 750,000 doses distributed for the first dose of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and one case per 2.4 million doses of OPV distributed overall. Because of this risk, most parents prefer a vaccine schedule that starts with inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), even though extra injections are required. IPV does not cause VAPP. New studies show that high immunization rates can be achieved in disadvantaged populations with a schedule starting with IPV. The American Academy of Family Physicians now recommends that the first two doses of poliovirus vaccine should be IPV; that is, either an all-IPV schedule or a sequential schedule of two doses of IPV followed by two doses of OPV. OPV is no longer recommended for the first two doses and is acceptable only under special circumstances, such as when parents do not accept the recommended number of injections.


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