Items in AFP with MESH term: Information Services

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An Update on Tobacco Cessation Reimbursement - Feature


Diagnosis and Managment of Fragile X Syndrome - Article

ABSTRACT: To complement the 2005 Annual Clinical Focus on medical genomics, AFP will be publishing a series of short reviews on genetic syndromes. This series was designed to increase awareness of these diseases so that family physicians can recognize and diagnose children with these disorders and understand the kind of care they might require in the future. The first review in this series discusses fragile X syndrome.


Keeping Up with the Medical Literature: How to Set Up a System - Article

ABSTRACT: The best way to keep up with the medical literature is to set up a system that delivers valid, relevant information while filtering out extraneous information. Useful information is patient-oriented, practical, and innovative. Good information systems are available that are inexpensive and easy to use.


How to Find Answers to Clinical Questions - Article

ABSTRACT: Many barriers exist to finding answers to physicians' clinical questions. Lack of time, resources, and computer skills, as well as physicians' environment and attitudes about problem solving, all contribute to unanswered questions. Making use of computer-based information resources can give physicians a framework for answering questions and keeping their practice consistent with the best available evidence.


Clinical Inquiries from the Family Practice Inquiries Network - Editorials


Transgender Care Resources for Family Physicians - Editorials


Adolescent Dating Violence - Editorials


NCCN and ACS Collaborate on a Patient's Version of the NCCN Practice Guidelines for Breast Cancer - Special Medical Reports


Avoiding Drug Interactions - Editorials


Down Syndrome: Prenatal Risk Assessment and Diagnosis - Article

ABSTRACT: Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is the most commonly recognized genetic cause of mental retardation. The risk of trisomy 21 is directly related to maternal age. All forms of prenatal testing for Down syndrome must be voluntary. A nondirective approach should be used when presenting patients with options for prenatal screening and diagnostic testing. Patients who will be 35 years or older on their due date should be offered chorionic villus sampling or second-trimester amniocentesis. Women younger than 35 years should be offered maternal serum screening at 16 to 18 weeks of gestation. The maternal serum markers used to screen for trisomy 21 are alpha-fetoprotein, unconjugated estriol and human chorionic gonadotropin. The use of ultrasound to estimate gestational age improves the sensitivity and specificity of maternal serum screening.


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