Items in AFP with MESH term: Life Expectancy

Geriatric Screening and Preventive Care - Article

ABSTRACT: Preventive health care decisions and recommendations become more complex as the population ages. The leading causes of death (i.e., heart disease, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory disease) among older adults mirror the actual causes of death (i.e., tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) among persons of all ages. Many aspects of mortality in older adults are modifiable through behavior change. Patients 65 years and older should be counseled on smoking cessation, diets rich in healthy fats, aerobic exercise, and strength training. Other types of preventive care include aspirin therapy; lipid management; and administration of tetanus and diphtheria, pneumococcal, and influenza vaccines. Although cancer is the second leading cause of death in patients 65 years and older, a survival benefit from cancer screening is not seen unless the patient's life expectancy exceeds five years. Therefore, it is best to review life expectancy, functionality, and comorbidities with older patients when making cancer screening recommendations. Other recommended screenings include abdominal aortic aneurysm for men 65 to 75 years of age, breast cancer for women 40 years and older with a life expectancy greater than five years, and colorectal cancer for men and women 50 years and older with a life expectancy greater than five years.


Cancer Screening in Older Patients: Life Expectancy, Prioritization, and Health Literacy - Editorials


Discussing End-of-Life Care With Your Patients - Feature


Eliminating Health Disparities: Our Mission, Our Vision, Our Cause - Editorials


Determining Prognoses for Patients with Terminal Illnesses - Curbside Consultation


Preventive Care for the Elderly: Getting By in the Absence of Evidence - Editorials



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