Items in AFP with MESH term: Mass Screening

Pages: Previous 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ... 20 Next

ACS Releases Updated Guidelines on Cancer Screening - Practice Guidelines


Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnancy: Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


Screening for Hyperlipidemia in Children: Primum Non Nocere - Editorials


Hyperlipidemia Treatment in Children: The Younger, the Better - Editorials


Screening and Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder in Children and Adolescents - Putting Prevention into Practice


Bilirubin Screening in Newborns: What Should We Do? - Editorials


Translating a Guideline into Practice: The USPSTF Recommendations on Screening for Depression in Adults - Editorials


Health Maintenance in School-aged Children: Part I. History, Physical Examination, Screening, and Immunizations - Article

ABSTRACT: The goals of the well-child examination in school-aged children (kindergarten through early adolescence) are promoting health, detecting disease, and counseling to prevent injury and future health problems. A complete history should address any concerns from the patient and family and screen for lifestyle habits, including diet, physical activity, daily screen time (e.g., television, computer, video games), hours of sleep per night, dental care, and safety habits. School performance can be used for developmental surveillance. A full physical examination should be performed; however, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine scoliosis screening and testicular examination. Children should be screened for obesity, which is defined as a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex, and resources for comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions should be provided to children with obesity. Although the evidence is mixed regarding screening for hypertension before 18 years of age, many experts recommend checking blood pressure annually beginning at three years of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends vision and hearing screening annually or every two years in school-aged children. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for dyslipidemia in children of any age, or screening for depression before 12 years of age. All children should receive at least 400 IU of vitamin D daily, with higher doses indicated in children with vitamin D deficiency. Children who live in areas with inadequate fluoride in the water (less than 0.6 ppm) should receive a daily fluoride supplement. Age-appropriate immunizations should be given, as well as any missed immunizations.


Update on Subclinical Hyperthyroidism - Article

ABSTRACT: Subclinical hyperthyroidism is defined by low or undetectable serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, with normal free thyroxine and total or free triiodothyronine levels. It can be caused by increased endogenous production of thyroid hormone (as in Graves disease or toxic nodular goiter), administration of thyroid hormone for treatment of malignant thyroid disease, or unintentional excessive thyroid hormone therapy. The rate of progression to overt hyperthyroidism is higher in persons who have suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone levels compared with those who have low but detectable levels. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation in older adults, and with decreased bone mineral density in postmenopausal women; however, the effectiveness of treatment in preventing these conditions is unknown. There is lesser-quality evidence suggesting an association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and other cardiovascular effects, including increased heart rate and left ventricular mass, and increased bone turnover markers. Possible associations between subclinical hyperthyroidism and quality of life parameters, cognition, and increased mortality rates are controversial. Prospective randomized con- trolled trials are needed to address the effects of early treatment on potential morbidities to help determine whether screening should be recommended in the asymptomatic general population.


Should We Screen Patients for Barrett's Esophagus? No: The Case Against Screening - Editorials


Pages: Previous 1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ... 20 Next


Information From Industry