Items in AFP with MESH term: Mass Screening

Pages: Previous 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Next

Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip - Article

ABSTRACT: Screening programs relying primarily on physical examination techniques for the early detection and treatment of congenital hip abnormalities have not been as consistently successful as expected. Since the 1980s, increased attention has been given to ultrasound imaging of the hip in young infants (less than five months of age) as a possible tool for improving patient outcomes. Although ultrasound examination may not provide advantages over careful repeated physician examination for universal screening, a growing body of evidence indicates that ultrasound surveillance of mild abnormalities can reduce the need for bracing without worsening outcomes. Radiographic documentation of hip normality after the femoral nucleus of ossification has appeared (at three to five month of age) is still appropriate to rule out hip dysplasia.


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


AAP Recommends the Development of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Programs - Special Medical Reports


Issues in Newborn Screening for Phenylketonuria - Article

ABSTRACT: The blood sample for phenylketonuria (PKU) screening should be obtained at least 12 hours after the infant's birth. Newborn screening for PKU has largely eliminated mental retardation caused by this disease. If the first phenylalanine test demonstrates positive results, a repeat test should be performed. Treatment to prevent sequelae from this disorder is best carried out in cooperation with an experienced PKU center. Dietary care is expensive, and financial assistance may be necessary for many families. A phenylalanine-restricted diet should be started as soon as possible. Occasionally, cases of PKU are missed by newborn screening. Thus, a repeat PKU test should be performed in an infant who exhibits slow development.


Dietary Therapy for Children with Hypercholesterolemia - Article

ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence clearly shows that atherosclerosis begins in youth. The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) has recommended that children at high risk of developing coronary artery disease as adults be screened so that those with elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels can be treated, primarily by modification of diet. The initial approach to these youthful patients is to use the NCEP step I diet. This diet provides calories and nutrients that support normal growth and development, but limits saturated fat and total fat intake to no more than 10 and 30 percent of total calories, respectively, and cholesterol intake to no more than 100 mg per 1,000 kcal per day, to a maximum of 300 mg. If the goal of reducing the LDL cholesterol level to below 130 mg per dL (3.35 mmol per L) is not achieved, the more restrictive step II diet should be initiated. However, the step II diet may not provide sufficient calories and nutrients to support normal growth and development; therefore, trained nutritionists may be required to effectively manage a child on this diet.


Hypercholesterolemia in Children - Editorials


The Geriatric Patient: A Systematic Approach to Maintaining Health - Article

ABSTRACT: The number of persons 65 years of age and older continues to increase dramatically in the United States. Comprehensive health maintenance screening of this population is becoming an important task for primary care physicians. As outlined by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, assessment categories unique to elderly patients include sensory perception and injury prevention. Geriatric patients are at higher risk of falling for a number of reasons, including postural hypotension, balance or gait impairment, polypharmacy (more than three prescription medications) and use of sedative-hypnotic medications. Interventional areas that are common to other age groups but have special implications for older patients include immunizations, diet and exercise, and sexuality. Cognitive ability and mental health issues should also be evaluated within the context of the individual patient's social situation-not by screening all patients but by being alert to the occurrence of any change in mental function. Using an organized approach to the varied aspects of geriatric health, primary care physicians can improve the care that they provide for their older patients.


Cervical Cancer - Article

ABSTRACT: Cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. A preponderance of evidence supports a causal link between human papillomavirus infection and cervical neoplasia. The presence of high-risk human papillomavirus genital subtypes increases the risk of malignant transformation. Widespread use of the Papanicolaou smear has dramatically reduced the incidence of cervical cancer in developed countries. Accurate and early recognition of abnormal cytologic changes prevents progression of the disease from preinvasive to invasive. Research is under way to determine if efforts to reduce the false-negative rate of the Papanicolaou smear should include rescreening programs and fluid-based technology. Once cervical cancer is diagnosed, clinical staging takes place. Early-stage tumors can be managed with cone biopsy or simple hysterectomy. Higher stage tumors can be treated surgically or with radiotherapy. Advanced metastatic disease may respond to radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Protein markers for detection of recurrence and vaccines for prevention of cervical cancer are under investigation.


Update on Colorectal Cancer - Article

ABSTRACT: An estimated 129,400 new cases of colorectal cancer occurred in the United States during 1999. The lifetime risk of developing this cancer is 2.5 to 5 percent in the general population but two to three times higher in persons who have a first-degree relative with colon cancer or an adenomatous polyp. Between 70 and 90 percent of colorectal cancers arise from adenomatous polyps, whereas only 10 to 30 percent arise from sessile adenomas. Tumors or polyps that develop proximal to the splenic flexure carry a poorer prognosis than those that arise more distally, in part because of delayed diagnosis secondary to later development of symptoms. The Dukes system is the classic staging method for colorectal cancer; the TNM staging system is more detailed and therefore more useful for surgical purposes. Although screening guidelines vary, most agree that colorectal cancer screening should begin at 50 years of age in patients without a personal or family history of colorectal cancer.


Overcoming the Barriers to Change: Screening for Colorectal Cancer - Editorials


Pages: Previous 1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Next


Information From Industry