Items in AFP with MESH term: Migraine Disorders

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Newer Intranasal Migraine Medications - Article

ABSTRACT: Two new intranasal migraine medications, sumatriptan and dihydroergotamine mesylate, may offer specific advantages for patients who are seeking alternatives to various oral or parenteral migraine abortive therapies. Placebo-controlled clinical studies demonstrate that both intranasal forms are effective in relieving migraine headache pain, but published clinical trial information comparing these two intranasal medications with current abortive therapies is lacking. Both agents are generally well tolerated by patients, with the exception of mild, local adverse reactions of the nose and throat.


Headache Consortium Releases Guidelines for Use of CT or MRI in Migraine Work-Up - Practice Guidelines


Guidelines on Migraine: Part 2. General Principles of Drug Therapy - Practice Guidelines


Guidelines on Migraine: Part 3. Recommendations for Individual Drugs - Practice Guidelines


Guidelines on Migraine: Part 4. General Principles of Preventive Therapy - Practice Guidelines


Guidelines on Migraine: Part 5. Recommendations for Specific Prophylactic Drugs - Practice Guidelines


AAN/AHS Update Recommendations for Migraine Prevention in Adults - Practice Guidelines


Approach to Acute Headache in Adults - Article

ABSTRACT: Approximately one-half of the adult population worldwide is affected by a headache disorder. The International Headache Society classification and diagnostic criteria can help physicians differentiate primary headaches (e.g., tension, migraine, cluster) from secondary headaches (e.g., those caused by infection or vascular disease). A thorough history and physical examination, and an understanding of the typical features of primary headaches, can reduce the need for neuroimaging, lumbar puncture, or other studies. Some red flag signs and symptoms identified in the history or during a physical examination can indicate serious underlying pathology and will require neuroimaging or other testing to evaluate the cause of headache. Red flag signs and symptoms include focal neurologic signs, papilledema, neck stiffness, an immunocompromised state, sudden onset of the worst headache in the patient’s life, personality changes, headache after trauma, and headache that is worse with exercise. If an intracranial hemorrhage is suspected, head computed tomography without contrast media is recommended. For most other dangerous causes of headache, magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography is acceptable.


Aspirin With or Without Antiemetic for Acute Migraine Headaches in Adults - Cochrane for Clinicians


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