Items in AFP with MESH term: Mouth Neoplasms

Assessing Oral Malignancies - Article

ABSTRACT: Oral cancers account for approximately 3 percent of all cases of cancer in the United States. An estimated 30,000 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year, and about one half of them will eventually die of the disease. The most common type of oral cancer is squamous cell carcinoma. Sixty percent of oral cancers are well advanced by the time they are detected, even though physicians and dentists frequently examine the oral cavity. The two most important risk factors for oral cancer are tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption. The keys to reducing mortality are prevention and control. The earlier any intraoral or extraoral abnormalities or lesions are detected and biopsied, the more lives can be saved. Controversy exists whether screening programs effectively reduce the mortality rate. Specific step-by-step guidelines should be followed to perform an adequate examination of the head and neck.


Common Oral Lesions: Part II. Masses and Neoplasia - Article

ABSTRACT: Certain common oral lesions appear as masses, prompting concern about oral carcinoma. Many are benign, although some (e.g., leukoplakia) may represent neoplasia or cancer. Palatal and mandibular tori are bony protuberances and are benign anomalies. Oral pyogenic granulomas may appear in response to local irritation, trauma, or hormonal changes of pregnancy. Mucoceles represent mucin spillage into the oral soft tissues resulting from rupture of a salivary gland duct. Oral fibromas form as a result of irritation or masticatory trauma, especially along the buccal occlusal line. Oral cancer may appear clinically as a subtle mucosal change or as an obvious mass. Oral leukoplakia is the most common premalignant oral lesion. For persistent white or erythematous oral lesions, biopsy should be performed to rule out neoplastic change or cancer. Most oral cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. Tobacco and heavy alcohol use are the principal risk factors for oral cancer. Family physicians should be able to recognize these lesions and make appropriate referrals for biopsy and treatment.


Screening for the Early Detection and Prevention of Oral Cancer - Cochrane for Clinicians



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