Items in AFP with MESH term: Nebulizers and Vaporizers

Recognition and Management of Exercise-Induced Brochospasm - Article

ABSTRACT: Exercise-induced bronchospasm is an obstruction of transient airflow that usually occurs five to 15 minutes after physical exertion. Although this condition is highly preventable, it is still underrecognized and affects aerobic fitness and quality of life. Diagnosis is based on the results of a detailed history, including assessment of asthma triggers, symptoms suggestive of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and a normal forced expiratory volume at one second at rest. A trial of therapy with an inhaled beta agonist may be instituted, with the subsequent addition of inhaled anti-inflammatory agents or ipratropium bromide. Nonpharmacologic measures, such as increased physical conditioning, warm-up exercises, and covering the mouth and nose, should be instituted. If symptoms persist, pulmonary function testing is warranted to rule out underlying lung disease.


The 'Crashing Asthmatic' - Article

ABSTRACT: Asthma is a common chronic disorder, with a prevalence of 8 to 10 percent in the U.S. population. From 5 to 10 percent of patients have severe disease that does not respond to typical therapeutic interventions. To prevent life-threatening sequelae, it is important to identify patients with severe asthma who will require aggressive management of exacerbations. Objective monitoring of pulmonary status using a peak flow meter is essential in patients with persistent asthma. Patients who have a history of fragmented health care, intubation, or hospitalization for asthma and those with mental illness or psychosocial stressors are at increased risk for severe asthma. Oxygen, beta2 agonists, and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstays of acute asthma therapy. Inhaled anticholinergic medications provide additional bronchodilation. In patients who deteriorate despite usual therapeutic efforts, evidence supports individualized use of parenteral beta2 agonists, magnesium sulfate, aminophylline, leukotriene inhibitors, or positive pressure mask ventilation before intubation.


Childhood Asthma: Treatment Update - Article

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of childhood asthma has risen significantly over the past four decades. A family history of atopic disease is associated with an increased likelihood of developing asthma, and environmental triggers such as tobacco smoke significantly increase the severity of daily asthma symptoms and the frequency of acute exacerbations. The goal of asthma therapy is to control symptoms, optimize lung function, and minimize days lost from school. Acute care of an asthma exacerbation involves the use of inhaled beta2 agonists delivered by a metered-dose inhaler with a spacer, or a nebulizer, supplemented by anticholinergics in more severe exacerbations. The use of systemic and inhaled corticosteroids early in an asthma attack may decrease the rate of hospitalization. Chronic care focuses on controlling asthma by treating the underlying airway inflammation. Inhaled corticosteroids are the agent of choice in preventive care, but leukotriene inhibitors and nedocromil also can be used as prophylactic therapy. Long-acting beta2 agonists may be added to one of the anti-inflammatory medications to improve control of asthma symptoms. Education programs for caregivers and self-management training for children with asthma improve outcomes. Although the control of allergens has not been demonstrated to work as monotherapy, immunotherapy as an adjunct to standard medical therapy can improve asthma control. Sublingual immunotherapy is a newer, more convenient option than injectable immunotherapy, but it requires further study. Omalizumab, a newer medication for prevention and control of moderate to severe asthma, is an expensive option.


Are Metered-Dose Inhalers with Holding Chambers Better Than Nebulizers for Treating Acute Asthma? - Cochrane for Clinicians



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