Items in AFP with MESH term: Neoplasms

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Soy: A Complete Source of Protein - Article

ABSTRACT: Soybeans contain all of the essential amino acids necessary for human nutrition and have been grown and harvested for thousands of years. Populations with diets high in soy protein and low in animal protein have lower risks of prostate and breast cancers than other populations. Increasing dietary whole soy protein lowers levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides; may improve menopausal hot flashes; and may help maintain bone density and decrease fractures in postmenopausal women. There are not enough data to make recommendations concerning soy intake in women with a history of breast cancer. The refined soy isoflavone components, when given as supplements, have not yielded the same results as increasing dietary whole soy protein. Overall, soy is well tolerated, and because it is a complete source of protein shown to lower cholesterol, it is recommended as a dietary substitution for higher-fat animal products.


Cancer Screening in Older Patients: Life Expectancy, Prioritization, and Health Literacy - Editorials


Green Tea: Potential Health Benefits - Article

ABSTRACT: Green tea has been used widely and in high doses for centuries as a health tonic in many societies. Evidence suggests that green tea is effective for treating genital warts. There is some supportive evidence for the use of green tea in cancer prevention. Drinking green tea is associated with a decrease in all-cause mortality, but not in cancer-related mortality. Small clinical studies have found that green tea may also be helpful in losing and managing weight, and lowering cholesterol. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that green tea may prevent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Green tea appears to be safe, although there have been case reports of hepatotoxicity possibly related to a specific extract in pill or beverage form. Green tea seems to be a low-risk complementary therapy for a number of conditions, but more studies are needed.


Recent Advances in Radiation Therapy - Article

ABSTRACT: Recent advances have improved the effectiveness, decreased the complications, and expanded the implications of radiation therapy. These advances include three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and radioimmunotherapy. Each of these modalities has improved radiation targeting, thereby limiting radiation exposure of healthy tissues. The way radiation therapy is administered has also changed. Although traditional external beam radiation therapy is administered daily over several weeks, stereotactic radiotherapy may be administered as a one-time treatment. Radioimmunotherapy is administered intravenously. Contemporary radiation techniques also have distinct toxicity profiles. The high radiation doses employed during stereotactic radiotherapy have been associated with obliteration or obstruction of tubular structures, such as bronchi and bile ducts, limiting its use near these tissues. Radioimmunotherapy may be complicated by anaphylactic reactions during and following infusions. As more patients are diagnosed with cancer and as these patients live longer, primary care physicians will increasingly care for those who have received radiation therapy.


Long-Term Benefits of a Vegetarian Diet - Editorials


N-Acetylcysteine: Multiple Clinical Applications - Article

ABSTRACT: N-acetylcysteine is the acetylated variant of the amino acid L-cysteine and is widely used as the specific antidote for acetaminophen overdose. Other applications for N-acetylcysteine supplementation supported by scientific evidence include prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, prevention of contrast-induced kidney damage during imaging procedures, attenuation of illness from the influenza virus when started before infection, treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, and treatment of infertility in patients with clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome. Preliminary studies suggest that N-acetylcysteine may also have a role as a cancer chemopreventive, an adjunct in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori, and prophylaxis of gentamicin-induced hearing loss in patients on renal dialysis.


So How Are You Doing? - The Last Word


Anticoagulation for the Long-term Treatment of VTE in Patients with Cancer - Cochrane for Clinicians


The Science and Politics of Cancer Screening - Editorials


Cancer Screening in Perspective - Editorials


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