Items in AFP with MESH term: Obesity

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Osteoarthritis: Diagnosis and Therapeutic Considerations - Article

ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis is a common rheumatologic disorder. It is estimated that 40 million Americans and 70 to 90 percent of persons older than 75 years are affected by osteoarthritis. Although symptoms of osteoarthritis occur earlier in women, the prevalence among men and women is equal. In addition to age, risk factors include joint injury, obesity, and mechanical stress. The diagnosis is largely clinical because radiographic findings do not always correlate with symptoms. Knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease process aids in prevention and management. Acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications remain first-line drugs. Agents such as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and sodium hyaluronate joint injections offer new treatment alternatives. Complementary medication use has also increased. Therapeutic goals include minimizing symptoms and improving function.


Family Physicians and the Childhood Obesity Epidemic - Editorials


Evaluating Obesity and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents - Article

ABSTRACT: Obesity continues to be a growing public health problem. According to the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 17 percent of persons two to 19 years of age are overweight. The number of obese children and adolescents has tripled in the past 20 years. Obesity in adults is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. The growing prevalence of overweight in children and adolescents is paralleled by the growth of its associated complications in that population: hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. A modification of the metabolic syndrome criteria designed for children and adolescents shows that as many as 50 percent of those who are severely overweight have the syndrome. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has not found sufficient evidence to support screening children for obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association have adopted a more aggressive stance, based largely on consensus opinion. Current suggestions include focusing on children whose body mass indexes exceed the 85th percentile; who are rapidly gaining weight; who have a family history of type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia; or who have hypertension or signs of insulin resistance. Physician advocacy for healthy communities and institutions that foster physical activity, good eating habits, and healthy lifestyles is also encouraged.


Low Glycemic Diets for Obesity Treatment - Cochrane for Clinicians


Primary Care's Ecologic Impact on Obesity - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

ABSTRACT: With a costly obesity epidemic, policy makers must recognize factors that may influence obesity not only for each person, but also across communities. Increased primary care physician density on the county level is associated with decreased obesity rates. As we move to restructure the primary care workforce and engage our patients and communities in behavior change, the implications of this association merit closer investigation.


Toward Sensitive Treatment of Obese Patients in Primary Care - Feature


Physicians Need Practical Tools to Treat the Complex Problems of Overweight and Obesity - Editorials


Children, Physical Activity, and Public Health: Another Call to Action - Editorials


Preventing Postpartum Weight Retention - Editorials


Obesity - Clinical Evidence Handbook


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