Items in AFP with MESH term: Patient Care Team

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Why Teamwork Will Make or Break Your Practice - Opinion


How to Solve Problems in Your Practice With a New Meeting Approach - Feature


Managing Pain at the End of Life - Editorials


Five Signs You May Have Joined the Wrong Practice - The Last Word


Family Physicians and Nursing Home Medicine: Forging a Partnership for Quality Care - Editorials


Neonatal Resuscitation: An Update - Article

ABSTRACT: Appropriate resuscitation must be available for each of the more than 4 million infants born annually in the United States. Ninety percent of infants transition safely, and it is up to the physician to assess risk factors, identify the nearly 10 percent of infants who need resuscitation, and respond appropriately. A team or persons trained in neonatal resuscitation should be promptly available to provide resuscitation. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program, which was initiated in 1987 to identify infants at risk of needing resuscitation and provide high-quality resuscitation, underwent major updates in 2006 and 2010. Among the most important changes are to not intervene with endotracheal suctioning in vigorous infants born through meconium-stained amniotic fluid (although endotracheal suctioning may be appropriate in nonvigorous infants); to provide positive pressure ventilation with one of three devices when necessary; to begin resuscitation of term infants using room air or blended oxygen; and to have a pulse oximeter readily available in the delivery room. The updated guidelines also provide indications for chest compressions and for the use of intravenous epinephrine, which is the preferred route of administration, and recommend not to use sodium bicarbonate or naloxone during resuscitation. Other recommendations include confirming endotracheal tube placement using an exhaled carbon dioxide detector; using less than 100 percent oxygen and adequate thermal support to resuscitate preterm infants; and using therapeutic hypothermia for infants born at 36 weeks’ gestation or later with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.


How Inclusive Leadership Can Help Your Practice Adapt to Change - Feature


An Organized Approach to Chronic Disease Care - Feature


Keys to High-Functioning Office Teams - Feature


Special Issue: Chronic Illness Care - From The Editor


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